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Julienne Molineaux: Stuff-Me - The Newspaper Gobble-Up

In New Zealand, concentration of newspaper ownership via mergers and acquisitions has a long pre-digital history. The trends of declining readership and fragmented audiences began before digital content, and mergers and acquisitions proceeded apace, enabled by weak legislative protections. More>>

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Scoop Foundation Membership Drive:

The Scoop Foundation: The best chance to create an independent guardian for public interest journalism in NZ

The Scoop Foundation is seeking public support to safeguard the future of public interest journalism in New Zealand. To ensure public access to comprehensive, free, timely news is maintained during this dark hour for journalism. And to provide every voice in NZ the opportunity to be heard in the national debate. More>>
PLEDGE NOW: Journalism: A New Model - The 2016 Scoop Foundation Membership Drive

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Gordon Campbell: On Trump And The Madman Theory

Years ago, Richard Nixon explained to his chief adviser Bob Haldeman what has since become known as the “Madman Theory” of foreign policy. Basically, if America’s rivals could be reminded that Nixon was an unstable, rabid anti-Communist with his finger on the nuclear trigger, Nixon reasoned, then maybe they’d be less willing to challenge the US in the world’s hot spots… More>>

Australia And The South China Sea: Another Foreign Policy Blunder Looming

James O’Neill: The overblown rhetoric from the United States has led at least one commentator to describe so-called ‘analyses’ of the South China Sea situation as “the biggest load of analytical rubbish about South East Asia to emerge since the CIA mistook bee feces for a Soviet-supplied biological weapon in 1981.” More>>

People's Candidates: A Peaceful Political Revolution Begins In France

Alastair Thompson profiles Philippe Mazuel one of 86 largely unknown political contenders who stepped up to become the "People's Candidate" for France's 2017 Presidential election. More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Whether Donald Trump Has Peaked

Perhaps come August, when the Republicans will finally get to anoint their candidate at their convention in Cleveland, Trump’s fortunes will have waned and the delegate count will be sufficiently deadlocked as to create a ‘contested convention’ whereby the party might then be able to turn to a different, dark horse candidate… Dream on. More>>

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Max Rashbrooke At 'Future Of Work' Conference: Labour: Lions Or Pussycats?
So far the debate generated by Labour’s conference has been about the universal basic income (UBI), a guaranteed annual payment to every adult regardless of status. It’s probably the big new idea in this field and has proponents across the political spectrum. But Labour won’t actually go there soon ... More>>

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Richard McLachlan: Sanders - Who Dares Wins
This past Wednesday, Rolling Stone magazine stamped the Clinton campaign with the boomer generation’s rock’n roll imprimatur. The editor Jann Wenner, in a cogent but not especially persuasive article, endorsed Hillary as the Joan of Arc of this current debacle. More>>

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3 To 24 March: Flag Referendum Voting Papers Out
3/3 The second referendum on the New Zealand flag begins today, with more than three million voting packs being delivered to mailboxes over the next week. More>>

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Other Flags: Hōne Heke’s Tribal Flag Comes To Auckland
This powerful taonga from the Te Matarahurahu hapū, the first Māori clan to sign the Treaty of Waitangi, will travel from Waitangi to be unveiled during a dawn pōwhiri at MOTAT on Thursday 3 March 2016. More>>

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Flag Debate Moves To Doggerel: Poetry For Sport And War
Robert Kelly: A video, published on YouTube on Monday, features NZ theatre stalwart Ian Mune applying his best gravelly tones to a string of stanzas providing an extremely selective version of New Zealand history titled ‘Lest We Forget: The Real Flag’. Now while I don’t want to address the politics particularly, I do want to talk about the poetry. More>>

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Binoy Kampmark: Retrospective Crucifixion - The Anger Over Maria Sharapova
On hearing that Maria Sharapova had confessed to testing positive to the banned substance of meldonium, now deemed a performance enhancing drug, the anger issued forth. More>>

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Gordon Campbell: On Why We’re Sitting Ducks For The Power Companies
As we look towards winter, it may pay to ask some basic questions about the direction in which power bills are headed… arguably, the energy companies that currently dominate the electricity market are in a sunset industry. More>>

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The State Of Public Services: What Does Bill English’s Manic Grin Tell Us?
When he’s giving a speech, our finance minister’s default expression is one of sober reasonableness. Everything is calm, reassuring, commonsense and practical. But there are these strange moments where Bill English will say something blindingly obvious, and give a slightly manic, fixed grin. More>>

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Werewolf: The Great Financial Crisis Still To Come
Max Rashbrooke interviews Financial Times columnist John Kay: When John Kay was at school in Edinburgh in the 1960s, his less able classmates – the ones who, he says, “weren’t going to get as good maths grades as I was” – were destined for a career in banking. In those days finance was a gentle profession, with plenty of time for long lunches and a round of golf or two... More>>

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Binoy Kampmark: The Dissenting Jurisprudence Of Antonin Scalia
“We mourn his passing, and we pray that his successor on the Supreme Court will take his place as a champion for the written Constitution and the Rule of Law.” These words from Texas Governor Greg Abbott say much about the late Justice Antonin Scalia and his conservative dominance on the bench he made his own from 1986. More>>

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Franklin Lamb From The Middle East: Social Control Is Emerging As ISIS (Da’ish) Motive
It is widely recognized that the damage done to our cultural heritage in Syria and to the heritage of those who will follow us, cannot be calculated... Heretofore, three varying but cogent explanations for ISIS’ rabid destruction of our shared cultural heritage have been commonplace. More>>

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Gordon Campbell: On The Myopia Of The Business News
Listening to the business news is a bit like eavesdropping on the radio transmissions from space aliens. There is no discernible connection between the concerns of the captains of these space ships – the bank economists and the finance house spokesmen – and the concerns of ordinary listeners back on Planet Earth. More>>

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Gordon Campbell: On Clinton, Sanders, Trump And Cruz
Come November, the world will have a new US president-elect and the least unlikely winner still looks to be Hillary Clinton. Right now though, the polls are showing a rocky stretch ahead for her in the immediate future. More>>

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Binoy Kampmark: Sean Penn And El Chapo - Vanity, Hollywood And Reportage
Leaving aside Sean Penn’s personal history with drug use, let alone alleged efforts to get a slice of celebrity in portraying a drug lord, the furore surrounding his interview with El Chapo is instructive in a few respects. One is worth noting: the blind rage it has provoked with some US political figures and advocates who show how utterly lacking in understanding they are of their own liberal market system... More>>

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Gordon Campbell: On Podemos, And Spain’s Election Stalemate
By hard grassroots effort, it convincingly rejected the fragmented, individualising forces that had shaped political life for the past few decades – instead, it organized its supporters on the basis of their common, communal experience via collective decision-making aimed at rolling back (a) the austerity-driven cutbacks in public services and (b) the home evictions of those unable to meet their mortgage payments. More>>

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