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Proposed New Road Up For Public Submission

The public now have their chance to have a say on the proposed new road connecting East Tamaki and State Highway 1 and the upgrading of the motorway interchange in Otahuhu.

Notices of Requirement will be publicly notified from March 17. Interested parties will have six weeks to make formal submissions. Manukau City Council and Auckland City Councils say anyone directly affected by the proposed works will be sent a notification pack that will include details of the Notices of Requirement. A full copy of the Notices will also be available at Otara and Otahuhu libraries.

Leigh Auton, Director Environmental Management, says the proposed road will open up job opportunities in East Tamaki and take heavy vehicles of residential roads.

“Over the next 15 years the number of people employed in East Tamaki is expected to double. Eventually there is expected to be an extra 40 000 people living in the area. The new road will meet the demands of this growth, improve access and relieve traffic congestion,” says Mr Auton.

At present the Otahuhu interchange does not meet safe operating standards. The upgraded interchange will improve safety by removing heavy traffic from residential streets and at the same time improve access into East and West Otahuhu.

A community meeting has been organised for and by residents in the Wymondley area on 26 March 2001 7pm at the Wymondley Primary School Hall. A large-scale model of the proposed works will be available for viewing so residents can visually see how the road might impact on them.
Ends


Frequently Asked Questions

Why does the Otahuhu scheme need to be changed?
The proposed interchange at Wymondley is only a short distance away from the existing Otahuhu on and off ramps. Demands on this section of motorway will increase if the new connection comes into operation. To ensure the continued safe and efficient operation of the motorway it is important to create an improved interchange at Otahuhu.

The Otahuhu interchange does not meet current safe operating standards. Creating a new interchange at Otahuhu will improve safety by directing heavy traffic along Princes St, an existing arterial road, and remove it from several residential streets.

Have people living in the area been consulted?
Since July 1998 several options have been extensively reviewed through a process of public consultation and analysis. This led to a decision by Transit and Manukau City Council to support the current proposal, known as option 4(a). This option is expected to provide the best balance between community needs, economic criteria and environmental effects.

The consultation process continues, and has now shifted into an important phase. Interested parties now have an opportunity to influence the project by making submissions on the NOR applications.

A number of resource consent applications will be lodged with the Auckland Regional Council in the near future. These applications will also be notified, with submissions invited from the public.
When could work on this project begin?
Depending on planning approval, the earliest likely date for work to begin would be October 2002.

What will happen to the submission?
Within six to eight weeks of submissions closing, the Council will write to the submitter telling them when a hearing will be held. At the hearing, anyone who has made a submission can speak.

Who will hear the submissions?
Manukau and Auckland City Councils will hold a joint hearing. Submissions could be heard by a panel of councillors, or the Councils may decide to appoint independent commissioners.

How will a decision be made?
After the hearing, the Council makes a recommendation back to the requiring authorities (Transit and Manukau City Council). This will recommend that the requiring authorities should confirm (with or without conditions) or withdraw the requirements.
The requiring authority makes a decision whether to accept or reject that recommendation, in whole or part.
The Council must ensure that everyone who made a submission receives notice of the decision by the requiring authority.
The Council or any submitter to the NOR may appeal the decision made by the requiring authority to the Environment Court.

How long will this process take?
If there are appeals to the Environment Court, the process could take well over a year.

How many properties are affected and how many have been purchased by TransitNZ and MCC in Otahuhu and Otara?

The following properties have been purchased:

Otahuhu
A total of 23 properties have been purchased.
130 Princes Street which involves 3 vacant housing sites has also been purchased.
A further 2 properties are currently in negotiation.

Otara
Five properties have been purchased.
A further three are currently in negotiation.
Commercial land adjacent to the motorway.

PROJECT PROPERTY IMPACTS – BASED ON PROPERTY TITLES:

The project has impacts on a number of properties in different ways. Some have been identified as been wholly required (as a mitigation measure), others where there is a partial impact and therefore partial land take, and others that are required during construction for access etc.

Wholly Affected Properties
Otahuhu – 35 ( these include multi unit developments)
Otara - 21

Partially Affected
In East Tamaki– 31
In Wymondley/Otara – 7 (includes the school)
In Otahuhu – 30

Construction Impacts
Otahuhu – 6

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