Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 

Need For Diversity Of Housing Highlighted

“The Need For Diversity Of Housing Highlighted In ARC Report”

Auckland’s population structure is to become more diverse in the future, as well as more complex, translating into a wide variety of housing needs. From a housing supply viewpoint, diversity will be key.

An Auckland Regional Council (ARC) report released this week states that “Consequent to the diversity of population, there is no longer a mass housing market or even sub-markets. Instead, housing demand is fragmented according to complex matrices that reflect different household characteristics including age, ethnicity, family type, work status, life stage, household size, income, relative location, and general housing preferences.”

Each of these components influences demand for the size, location, number of bedrooms, private open space, design, and construction of a dwelling.

Made up of data from two five-year periods (1986-1991 and 1991-1996) as well as population projections to 2021, the study aims to provide a picture of how the nature of population structure influences housing preferences.
It points out several significant trends:

- There has been a trend towards larger households. Explanations of this trend include: An increase in flatting adults; adult children living with their parents longer; ‘empty nesters’ not downsizing property (the majority of empty nesters still live in three bedroom dwellings).

- There has been a trend towards dwellings with at least one or two bedrooms more than there are household members (Thus smaller households do not necessarily equate to a desire for smaller dwellings)

- The majority of young couples are in three bedroom dwellings.

- Older singles living on their own are equally likely to be in two and three bedroom dwellings.

- Household sizes have not decreased over the last 10 years. Nevertheless, population projections into the future assume that they will decrease, albeit at a slower rate than in other regions.

- One and two member households are relatively less common now than they were a decade ago.

- Nevertheless, one and two bedroom dwellings have not increased at the same rate as one and two member households.


Population projections lend support to the following conclusions:

- approximately 201,000 new dwellings will be required up until 2021 (using 1996 figures as a base).

- Of the 201,000 new dwellings required, the greatest numbers of new households will need to be located in each of the Central and Southern Sectors.

- Improved health will impact on the housing needs of the ageing population in the future- this may encourage them to stay in their family homes longer than they otherwise would or did in the past.

ARC Strategic Policy Committee Chairperson Gwen Bull supports the research as vital to understanding the future of housing in Auckland. “Matching the supply of housing with demand is an important and complex component in the implementation of the region’s Growth Strategy. This data provides guidance as to the future demand – in terms of numbers, type and location of housing – and will help ensure appropriate housing policies.”

“However, to draw solid conclusions of future situations, this study would have to be followed up with qualitative research – to investigate in greater detail the possible explanations behind the observed trends.” She adds that there would need to be research into the relationship between housing cost and housing size or type (i.e. is it dependent on affordability issues; age? What other issues influence preferences?).

Cr. Bull concludes “It is important to understand the changes in housing preferences and how changes in population structure affect these preferences.”

- END -

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Rebuilding: Silvia Cartwright To Lead Inquiry Into EQC

“The inquiry will be the first of its kind under the Public Inquiries Act 2013 and will have all the powers of a Royal Commission, be independent of Government and make its report directly to the Governor-General.

“The aim of the inquiry is to learn from the experience of the Canterbury earthquakes and ensure that the Earthquake Commission is fit for purpose in future events.

“The insurance system as a whole, including EQC’s role in that system, needs to be ready to deliver services to those affected by the next big event – whenever or wherever that happens." More>>

 

Gordon Campbell: On The Royal Commission Into Child Abuse

Obviously, it is good news that the coalition government has broadened the scope of its Royal Commission into the abuse of children, beyond its previous focus on children in state care. More>>

ALSO:

Cases Delayed: Court Staff Refuse To Handle Sentencing Papers

Dozens of court cases have reportedly been delayed, as court staff escalate industrial action at two Auckland courts by enforcing a ban on handling sentencing papers. More>>

ALSO:

Education: Primary Teachers Rolling Strikes

RNZ Report: More than 100,000 primary school students in Auckland will be home from school today as teachers and principals walk off the job for the second time this year. It's the start of a week of rolling one-day strikes around the country, after the collapse of contract negotiations last Thursday. More>>

ALSO:

"Process Was Sound": Inquiry Into Haumaha Appointment Released

The Inquiry’s purpose was to examine, identify, and report on the adequacy of the process that led to the appointment. It found the process was sound and no available relevant information was omitted. More>>

ALSO:

Govt Loses In Supreme Court: Call For Debate On Prisoners' Right To Vote

The court earlier this week upheld a High Court decision which found that a law restricting a prisoner's right to vote was inconsistent with the Bill of Rights. More>>

ALSO:

Shenanigans: NZ First Accepts Jami-Lee Ross Proxy Vote

The New Zealand First caucus strongly believes that in terms of the Electoral Integrity Amendment Act, that someone in Mr Ross’ position should resign his seat... the New Zealand First Whip will use Mr Ross’ proxy–to be exercised at all times in support of the vote of the National Party... More>>

ALSO:

Call For Conversation: Do You Know What Data Is Being Collected About You?

New Zealand Maori Council has called on a national conversation when it comes to data sovereignty asking the question “just how many people know what data is being collected, why and how is it being used?” More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

InfoPages News Channels