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City's Annual Report sets out year's achievements


City's Annual Report sets out year's achievements

North Shore City's Annual Report, setting out the past financial year's achievements, was adopted at tonight's (September 25) council meeting.

North Shore City is one of the first local authorities in the country to have its Annual Report for the last financial year audited. The council's Annual Report for 2001/02 was completed on September 2, Audit New Zealand signed an unqualified audit report on that date and the council adopted the report at its meeting on September 25. This is the earliest date that the North Shore City Council has achieved in its 13-year history.

The Annual Report outlines where and how funds were applied to deliver the city's wide range of activities and services over the past financial year (July 1, 2001 - June 30, 2002). Mayor George Wood says the city has continued to invest heavily in its sewerage network, and at the Rosedale wastewater treatment plant. While there will still be significant capital investment over the next few years, it is now well on the way to addressing past problems and coping with the city's expected growth over the next 25 years, he says.

"While the emphasis has been on improving beach water quality, the city has also been addressing concerns about traffic congestion," says Mr Wood.

"We've begun to see steady improvements in roading, in bus priority measures, and in bus services, that are the beginnings of the major work to be done over the next four years on the Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system." Tony Holman, who chairs North Shore City's strategy and finance committee, says the council's main goal is to run the city to a standard to help its recognition as one of the finest places in New Zealand in which to live, work and play.

Councillor Holman says that during the year:

* The council has reached agreement on the acquisition, maintenance and operation of the city's ferry wharves; * the District Plan has become operative in the most part; * the Glenfield library has been refurbished and a learning centre installed; * the city has moved to acquire a significant piece of land at Long Bay to extend the existing regional park for future generations, and also bought farmland at Paremoremo to convert to a coastal park.

"The government's proposed new legislation governing the functions and responsibilities of local government could lead to important changes," he says. "We'll be watching this development carefully as it progresses into law. In the meantime the city will continue to work hard to maintain its unique assets, and do more to protect the quality of life that so many come to the city to enjoy." The city's operating surplus was $18.7 million for the 2001/02 year; it invested $92.5 million on capital works; and debt stood at $66.2 million. Total city assets were $2,067 million, with ratepayers' equity a total of $1,945 million.

Significant projects include those for wastewater, stormwater and water supply, on transport, and waste minimisation. Further, the city has now formally adopted its Strategic Plan, City Blueprint and Action Plan, and has spent more than $1 million on books and other resources for its six libraries.

A range of other projects is set out and the financial details listed in the report that will shortly be available on the council's website, http://www.nscc.govt.nz.


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