Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Motorway project values Auckland’s heritage


Motorway project values Auckland’s heritage

A historic flue, which has been rebuilt on the site of Auckland’s Grafton Gully motorway upgrading project, now serves as an archaeological reminder of the city’s early industrial heritage. It is part of one of the original furnaces of the 19th century Phoenix Foundry.

The flue has been rebuilt on the corner of Stanley Street and the new Grafton Road Bridge which is a section of the popular Coast-to-Coast walkway.

Providing a rare glimpse of early Auckland, the brick flue commemorates the city’s early industrial heritage which was primarily based around what was Mechanics Bay (bordered by Beach Rd and The Strand). The flue is a good example of late 19th century workmanship with its accurately bevelled arch bricks that allowed a curved construction.

The reconstruction of the flue was initiated and financed by the Freeflow Alliance, the delivery consortium of the Grafton Gully motorway project. Grafton Gully project manager, Kim Barrett, explains, “We wanted to preserve and share the local heritage, which we uncovered in the course of the project. By rebuilding the furnace we were able to honour the area’s heritage and make a lasting contribution to the public.”

Archaeological consultants, Clough & Associates Ltd were responsible for the excavation and documentation of all historic finds throughout the project. Rod Clough explains that the Phoenix Foundry played an important role in Grafton Gully from the 1860s through to the 1950s when it finally ceased operating. The flue was part of a furnace that was primarily used for melting down scrap metal.

“The foundry was a large operation that was spread over two acres. It was a major employer in the area and provided engineering equipment for many industries throughout the North Island such as flour milling, shipwrights and mineral extraction. The remains of the furnace also revealed that it was involved in recycling scrap metal,” he says.

“The remains of half molten objects such as plough shares were also recovered during the course of the project, along with cast ingots. From historical records there are references to the manufacture of a range of items including anchor chains and water wheels which they supplied to local industries.”

During the course of the project’s two-year construction period, a number of significant finds were uncovered on the site. “We found many industrial items, remains of wells relating to old breweries, bottling companies and engineering businesses all contributing to our knowledge of Auckland’s early history.” Many of the artefacts will be placed in a museum and a detailed report on the investigations is being prepared.

Earlier this year, the project was honoured with an award from the NZ Archaeological Association for “outstanding efforts in archaeology”. “The project serves as a model of how to go about urban development in a way which values our heritage,” says Rod Clough.

ABOUT THE GRAFTON GULLY PROJECT The Grafton Gully Project is an integral part of Transit New Zealand’s Central Motorway Improvements. Together with the other two key roading projects (Central Motorway Junction and Harbour Bridge to City) the Grafton Gully Project will play an important role in improving the central motorway network and reducing congestion in Auckland. The area is largely used for traffic between the Northwestern and Southern motorways, the Ports of Auckland and the lower CBD as well as for access to Auckland Hospital, Mission Bay and Parnell.

The project, which is nearly completed, has already relieved the local street network by: extending the motorway to pass under Grafton Road and into Stanley St, removing the dogleg manoeuvre from Grafton Rd off-ramp to Stanley St removing the dogleg intersection that connects Stanley St, Beach Road, Parnell Rise and The Strand, enabling direct access between Stanley Street and The Strand providing a new link from Wellesley St to Grafton Rd widening Stanley Street and improving the intersections at Alten Rd and Beach Road ends For further information contact Transit New Zealand Regional Manager Wayne McDonald tel 368 2000

www.transit.govt.nz

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Sector Opposes Bill: Local Government Bill Timeframe Extended

The Minister of Local Government Peseta Sam Lotu-Iiga has asked the Select Committee to extend the report back date for the Local Government Act 2002 Amendment Bill (No 2). More>>

ALSO:

Breed Laws Don’t Work: Vets On New National Dog Control Plan

It is pleasing therefore to see Louise Upston Associate Minister for Local Government calling for a comprehensive solution... However, relying on breed specific laws to manage dog aggression will not work. More>>

ALSO:

Not Waiting On Select Committee: Green Party Releases Medically-Assisted Dying Policy

“Adults with a terminal illness should have the right to choose a medically assisted death,” Green Party health spokesperson Kevin Hague said. “The Green Party does not support extending assisted dying to people who aren't terminally ill because we can’t be confident that this won't further marginalise the lives of people with disabilities." More>>

ALSO:

General Election Review: Changes To Electoral Act Introduced

More effective systems in polling places and earlier counting of advanced votes are on their way through proposed changes to our electoral laws, Justice Minister Amy Adams says. More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Our Posturing At The UN

In New York, Key basically took an old May 2 Washington Post article written by Barack Obama, recycled it back to the Americans, and still scored headlines here at home… We’ve had a double serving of this kind of comfort food. More>>

ALSO:

Treaty Settlements: Bills Delayed As NZ First Pulls Support

Ngāruahine, Te Atiawa and Taranaki are reeling today as they learnt that the third and final readings of each Iwi’s Historical Treaty Settlement Bills scheduled for this Friday, have been put in jeopardy by the actions of NZ First. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Damage De-Regulation Is Doing To Fisheries And Education, Plus Kate Tempest

Our faith in the benign workings of the market – and of the light-handed regulation that goes with it – has had a body count. Back in 1992, the free market friendly Health Safety and Employment Act gutted the labour inspectorate and turned forestry, mining and other workplace sites into death traps, long before the Pike River disaster. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news