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Tapapakanga reopens

Tapapakanga reopens

6 April 2004

Tapapakanga Regional Park has reopened to the public after a month’s upgrade work on the bridge access to the park. A new bridge has been constructed to allow better vehicular access.

The park, located on the Firth of Thames south east of Auckland city, has a number of walking tracks, a 6.9km mountain bike track, beachfront campsite and a wide variety of bird life.

“The large spreading pöhutukawa trees on the park’s coastline make this a very special spot. The extensive farmland full of history and the variety of activities on offer combine to make this a regional park with something for everyone,” ARC Parks and Heritage Committee Chair Bill Burrill says.

“While Tapapakanga is increasingly popular, many Aucklanders have yet to experience the park. It is an ideal place for families to discover during the during the Easter School holidays.”

The park is rich in history and has a unique story. The Maori history of the area can be seen in the pou (carving) located at the entrance to the park and includes the unusual feature of James Ashby (former European owner) carrying an axe. James and his wife Rebecca built the existing kauri homestead on the main beach in 1900. They purchased the land in 1899, forming a unique partnership with the local Maori chief, felling and selling timber to Auckland

Tapapakanga Regional Park is located on the Firth of Thames coast. To get there from Auckland, take the Southern Motorway (State Highway 1) to the Papakura off-ramp. Head towards Clevedon Village, and through Kawakawa Bay and Orere Point. The Park is signposted from there.

Tapapakanga Regional Park is just one of the 21 regional parks managed by the Auckland Regional Council. For more information on regional parks visit www.arc.govt.nz or call 09 366 2000.

ENDS


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