Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Waitakere City Council fines itself

14 March, 2007

Waitakere City Council fined over failure to acquire building consents

The Waitakere City Council did the right thing in prosecuting itself for not getting consents to move some houses, says the judge who heard the case in the Waitakere District Court.

Judge Paul Barber, fined the council $800 plus $130 court costs on each of six charges brought by the council against itself.

Building consent is necessary before a house can be demolished or removed from a property.

The council had bought six properties for removal for the Project Twin Streams project but the houses were removed without building consents.

In some cases it had applied for consents but not yet received them.

In the other cases it had not applied.

The judge said that the prosecution was appropriate and that the mitigating factor was that the council had "turned its mind" to the need for consents, by making it a term of the removal contracts that the contractors obtain the necessary consents.

However, the council had not applied sufficient supervision to ensure that the consents were actually obtained.

"We feel vindicated by this decision," says Councillor Vanessa Neeson, chair of the council's Planning and Regulatory Committee.

"We have been mocked for prosecuting ourselves but it is a very important principle of democracy, justice and common fairness that if we are prepared to prosecute ordinary citizens and contractors for such things, we must be seen to be prosecuting ourselves too. We are not above the law," she says.

Two contractors have yet to be sentenced for their removal of the houses without consent.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

PARLIAMENT TODAY:

Mt Eden Prison: Serco Inquiry Extended

A two month delay to the Government investigation into prison fight clubs shows the extent of problems within the Serco circus, says Labour’s Corrections spokesperson Kelvin Davis. More>>

ALSO:

Health And Safety: Late Addition Of National Security Provisions A Concern

The New Zealand Law Society has expressed its significant concerns at the last-minute addition to the Health and Safety Reform Bill of provisions for a closed material procedure for court proceedings where national security is involved. More>>

ALSO:

Rugby And Beer: World Cup Alcohol Bill Passes

ACT MP David Seymour’s Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Extended licensing hours during Rugby World Cup) Bill completed its third reading by 99 to 21... More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Flag Campaign

So far, the public has treated the government’s flag campaign with something between disinterest and disdain. Most New Zealanders have instinctively seen through the marketing hype involved. More>>

Change For 2017: Local Govt To Decide On Easter Sunday Trading

The Government is to enable local communities, through councils, to decide whether retailers can open on Easter Sunday, Workplace Relations and Safety Minister Michael Woodhouse announced. More>>

ALSO:

(And Targets Worse Than Australia's): Foresters Abandoning Emissions Trading Scheme

The Government’s gutting of the Emissions Trading Scheme has caused foresters to leave and emissions to rise, says Labour’s Climate Change spokesperson Megan Woods. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news