Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Canterbury earthquake rekindles community spirit and drives

Canterbury earthquake rekindles community spirit and drives change

Auckland, March 6 2011 – The way people have responded to help each other and the people of Canterbury after the region’s devastating earthquakes has been welcomed by more than 350 Rotarians at a special conference in Auckland.

Rotarians in Christchurch are working alongside other agencies and the “student army” to help hand out supplies and to clean up. A Rotary New Zealand (www.rnzwcs.org) charity fund has already raised $260,000, which will be 100% channelled into helping the recovery and rebuild of the region.

The spirit of families, their neighbours and communities looking after and helping each other is a cornerstone of the international service club’s existence.

But the Rotarians attending the conference received a strong warning from Rotary leaders: to survive another 100 years Rotary has to change and become more relevant to new members, like New Zealanders pitching in to help Canterbury.

Stuart Heal, a Rotarian from Cromwell who is now a Rotary International Director, told the 230 “presidents-elect” that when they take over their clubs on July 1 this year they need to consider what type of club would suit their communities. The tradition of having to attend weekly meetings, have a meal and listen to a guest speaker may no longer be always appropriate.

Rotary internationally has trialled and formed e-clubs, embraced social media like Facebook and Twitter and a variety of new formats, including young professionals clubs within a host club, are evolving. Old style “sunset clubs” are being urged to set up newer ones and then eventually die.

“I think the earthquake has reinforced that people living in this country are, mostly, by nature caring and giving and will support a cause,” Mr Heal says. “Rotary can provide them a proven channel for doing that. But many people nowadays don’t want to feel constricted by conservative club rules.

“Rotary needs to find ways to become relevant to the way potential members live their lives and to show them that the networks and friendships that come with belonging to a powerful, international organisation like Rotary also have worthwhile benefits for them and their families.”

The Auckland meeting was the first time the 14 countries in the New Zealand and Pacific Islands zone for Rotary have combined for leaders’ training. Rotary International President Ray Klinginsmith, was in Auckland to reinforce the message for change.

Mr Klinginsmith also presented Rotary’s prestigious Paul Harris Fellow awards, for meritorious service, to Lina Joannes (Papakura), Rebecca Signal (Otorohanga), Judy Bain (Hutt Valley), Lindsay Crossen (Christchurch), John Prendergast (Invercargill) and Rufino Pineda (Vanuatu).

ends

Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 33,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Sector Opposes Bill: Local Government Bill Timeframe Extended

The Minister of Local Government Peseta Sam Lotu-Iiga has asked the Select Committee to extend the report back date for the Local Government Act 2002 Amendment Bill (No 2). More>>

ALSO:

Breed Laws Don’t Work: Vets On New National Dog Control Plan

It is pleasing therefore to see Louise Upston Associate Minister for Local Government calling for a comprehensive solution... However, relying on breed specific laws to manage dog aggression will not work. More>>

ALSO:

Not Waiting On Select Committee: Green Party Releases Medically-Assisted Dying Policy

“Adults with a terminal illness should have the right to choose a medically assisted death,” Green Party health spokesperson Kevin Hague said. “The Green Party does not support extending assisted dying to people who aren't terminally ill because we can’t be confident that this won't further marginalise the lives of people with disabilities." More>>

ALSO:

General Election Review: Changes To Electoral Act Introduced

More effective systems in polling places and earlier counting of advanced votes are on their way through proposed changes to our electoral laws, Justice Minister Amy Adams says. More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Our Posturing At The UN

In New York, Key basically took an old May 2 Washington Post article written by Barack Obama, recycled it back to the Americans, and still scored headlines here at home… We’ve had a double serving of this kind of comfort food. More>>

ALSO:

Treaty Settlements: Bills Delayed As NZ First Pulls Support

Ngāruahine, Te Atiawa and Taranaki are reeling today as they learnt that the third and final readings of each Iwi’s Historical Treaty Settlement Bills scheduled for this Friday, have been put in jeopardy by the actions of NZ First. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Damage De-Regulation Is Doing To Fisheries And Education, Plus Kate Tempest

Our faith in the benign workings of the market – and of the light-handed regulation that goes with it – has had a body count. Back in 1992, the free market friendly Health Safety and Employment Act gutted the labour inspectorate and turned forestry, mining and other workplace sites into death traps, long before the Pike River disaster. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news