Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Crime in Otago Rural down 14.1%

Crime in Otago Rural down 14.1%

Crime in Otago Rural (the local authority areas of Queenstown Lakes, Central Otago and Waitaki) continued its downward trend as the Area again recorded further reductions in the total amount of crime reported, with a decrease of 14.1 % in the year to 30 June 2012.

The total number of recorded offences in the year to 30 June 2012 was 4800, which continued the downward trend from 5589 in the year to 30 June 2011 and 6024 in the year to June 2010.

"These figures continue to build on the crime reductions made over the past three years across Otago Rural and reflect the efforts of our staff in conjunction with our communities and partner agencies, who are all working hard to prevent and reduce crime in our communities," said Inspector Mike Cook, Area Commander Otago Rural.

Police in Otago Rural have continued to deploy via local tasking and co-ordination processes to ensure a strong and consistent approach to crime prevention. This focus was a significant contributor to achieving continued crime reductions.

"As we move forward, Otago Rural will continue to set ambitious crime reduction targets to ensure that our communities remain amongst the safest in New Zealand," Inspector Cook said.

Inspector Cook said a number of new initiatives and tools would be coming into the Area over the next nine months all of which are designed to free up frontline staff from bureaucratic processes and re-invest this time into ensuring that Police increase their visibility and accessibility in the community and remain committed to further crime reductions.

The number of offences classed as Acts Intending to Cause Injury continued to decrease, dropping by 13.4% (502 down from 580). Theft and related offences again decreased by a further 5.2% (1342 down from 1416). Offences related to property damage continued their downward trend and were down a further 18.8% (879 down from 1083) in the year to 30 June 2012.

Total crime across Southern District is down 11.2 percent, from 24,933 to 22,133 in the year to 30 June 2012. The percentage of crime solved (known as the resolution rate) has also increased from 54.5% in the year to 30 June 2011 to 56.0% in the year to 30 June 2012.

Superintendent Bob Burns, Southern District Commander, says that the latest further district-wide decrease in crime, the third consecutive decrease, validates the fantastic work Southern staff carry out 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, on behalf of Southern communities.

"The shift from a more traditional model of policing to a stronger proactive and preventative model has had a major and positive impact on preventing and reducing crime, he says.

"Our intelligence-driven preventative policing model gives us better understanding of who our most active criminals are, what locations attract the most calls for police service and which victims are at greatest risk of re-victimisation. We can act with more urgency, make better deployment decisions, and work with key community partners to address identified drivers of crime to ensure we provide the greatest impact on the criminal environment and make real and sustained reductions in reported crime."

Supt. Burns says the key for Southern is 'sustained' reductions.

"I am particularly pleased that another significant decrease has occurred and, more importantly, all of our three policing areas (Southland, Otago Rural and Dunedin) have contributed to this great overall result."

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Departure Speech: Governor-General’s State Farewell Luncheon

"...Unfortunately I was unable to get to the Antarctic, the Chatham Islands and the Kermadecs. A dicky heart thwarted our travel to the Antarctic; and even though I volunteered to parachute into the Kermadecs to join the Young Blake expedition, time, commitments and officials frustrated my plans to visit the Kermadecs and Chathams." More>>

ALSO:

New Research: Most Homeless People Working Or Studying

“The cost of housing has been rising without corresponding increases in income, whilst the number of state houses per capita has been in decline. Many low-income people are missing out on housing, whether we recognise them as ‘homeless’ or not. More>>

ALSO:

Post-Traynor: New Offender Info Sharing Plan

“This Bill delivers on that step-change by moving away from name-based records held by individual agencies to a shared, anchor identity based on unalterable information, such as fingerprints and facial recognition. It also gives agencies access to the drivers’ licence photo database and birth, death and marriages information." More>>

  • NZ Law Foundation - New $2M fund for research on information challenges
  • Littoral: New Ship To Deliver Enhanced Naval Capability

    Defence Minister Gerry Brownlee says the Government has approved a Ministry of Defence and New Zealand Defence Force recommendation to request tenders for a new naval ship to support littoral operations. More>>

    July:

    After King's Labour Snub: Māori Party And Kiingitanga To Work Together

    Māori Party Co-leaders Te Ururoa Flavell and Marama Fox met with Kiingitanga representatives in Wellington yesterday to discuss working together on key issues for the betterment of Māori. More>>

    ALSO:

    Waitangi Claim On Rehabilitation: The 'Justus' System For Māori Not Good Enough

    Closing statements at the Waitangi Tribunal case against Corrections called for immediate steps and a comprehensive review to address the high rate of Māori reoffending. More>>

    ALSO:

    Advice: PM Sets Rules For Ministers' Treatment Of Public Servants

    Prime Minister John Key has laid down the law about the way ministers and public servants should interact, saying ministers may not always like the advice they receive, but they must listen to it carefully, respectfully and professionally. More>>

    Gordon Campbell: On The Funding Changes In Special Needs Education, And Uber

    The plan to strip out the educational support for older “special needs” children in order to meet the existing shortfall in funding for special needs in early childhood education is so miserly and relentlessly stupid as to defy belief… More>>

    SPECIAL EDUCATION (& More):

    Online Learning Plans:

    Get More From Scoop

     

    LATEST HEADLINES

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Regional
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news