Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


New $2.6 million Patea Water Plant Opened

MEDIA RELEASE DATE: 14 Nov 2012


New $2.6 million Patea Water Plant Opened

South Taranaki District Mayor, Ross Dunlop, and local kaumatua, Syd Kershaw, officially blessed and opened the new $2.6 million Patea Water Plant today.

The work, which involved building a new bore, reservoir and water plant, gives Patea a much greater security of water supply, particularly over summer, and means that the town will be fully compliant with the latest Drinking Water Standards.

Mayor Dunlop says the Council has invested a huge amount of time and money into upgrading and modernizing the District’s water supplies.

“Since 2005, the main priority of the Council has been on improving the District’s water infrastructure. Over the last six years we have completed nearly $50 million of work. Today our water supplies are more robust than they have ever been with new treatment plants, water bores, reservoirs and some interconnections between supplies,” he says.

STDC engineering assets and planning manager, Howard Wilkinson, says that as a result of work the Council has been doing in Patea over the last couple of years, they have been able to reduce water loss from the town’s pipe network by 80%.

“However, even with this great effort we still needed to build an extra borehole to supply enough water and allow one of the other boreholes to be maintained,” he says.

“We also drilled a monitoring well so we can check that we are not drawing sea water towards our boreholes. In the past, boreholes in Patea have had to be abandoned because they have become too salty,” says Mr Wilkinson.

Water from the two existing bores was analysed and showed the water was between 158-179 years old. “When water is that old, it’s very safe to drink as bacteria and protozoa cannot survive for that length of time.”

Mr Wilkinson also says while the old reservoir on the sand hill on the approach to Patea was a local landmark, it had to come to the end of its operational life.

“We had originally planned to build another reservoir next to it on the hill, but a seismic analysis showed that in an earthquake similar to those experienced in Christchurch, the stability of the hill couldn’t be guaranteed. So we had to build the new reservoir at the bottom of the hill and we pump water from the reservoir into the reticulation network to make sure the pressure is adequate. We also have an emergency generator onsite in case of power failure,” says Mr Wilkinson.

“The Ministry of Health also contributed grants of $360,000 (excl gst) to the upgrades,” he says.
In his closing remarks Mayor Dunlop reflected on other major projects in Patea which the Council had recently invested in; namely the multi-million dollar clean up of the old freezing works, construction of the new Museum and the town swimming pool.

Mr Dunlop says that over the next couple of years the Council has also budgeted around half a million dollars to replace some of the old pipes in the town’s water reticulation network.

- ENDS –

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Earth Day: Global March To Defend Science In NZ Saturday

The March for Science movement emerged in the immediate wake of President Trump’s inauguration as he moved quickly to curtail the power of the Environmental Protection Agency and limit the ability of government agencies to communicate scientific evidence.

Since then it has broadened to “champion robustly funded and publicly communicated science as a pillar of human freedom and prosperity”. More>>

'Opening The Election' Video: Nicky Hager And Mike Joy On Science, Spin, And Society

In two videos relevant to the March for Science from Scoop's 'Opening The Election' forum, Massey University's Dr Mike Joy spoke about promoting science in the face of government spin and journalist Nicky Hager offered a checklist of issues to promote for an open civil society. More>>

 

Health Workers Respond: People's Mental Health Report Released

The People's Mental Health Review reinforces a recent YesWeCare.nz survey of 6,000 health workers, which found nine in 10 believe they don't have the staff or resources to deliver the care Kiwis need when they need it. More>>

ALSO:

More Mental Health:


Energy: Greens Launch Plan For Cheaper And Cleaner Electricity

$112 million for winter warm-up payments to help low-income households cover their power bills • setting a goal for 100 percent renewable electricity by 2030 (in average hydrological conditions) • an investigation into the electricity wholesale market. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Aged-Care Settlement

Until yesterday, a National government has always been the sworn enemy of women seeking justice in the workplace, in the face of gender-based pay discrimination. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news