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More rural recycling and composting thanks to stickers

Media Release

Release date: Thursday, 15 November 2012
Fitzherbert Street, Gisborne, New Zealand. www.gdc.govt.nz

More rural recycling and composting thanks to stickers

The amount of waste going to landfill from rural areas has reduced by approximately half in October. This reduction will extend the life of the Waiapu landfill and the out of town landfill used by TPI AllBrites. Recycling tonnages are also up. Further monitoring over the next few months will give a more accurate picture.

A sticker system similar to that used in Gisborne city was introduced to rural areas at the end of September along with the delivery of free compost bins and composting workshops.

Mayor Meng Foon congratulates the way people in rural areas have dealt with the changes to their rubbish system. “Rural people have had a fantastic attitude and got themselves 'sorted' with the changes. There have been a few teething problems but most of these have been fixed now. It has been so much easier thanks to the patience and good old fashioned humour from the people affected.”

“I am pleased that the waste streams have reduced a lot and that the environment looks clean and something we can all be proud of.”

“Ratepayers with a property within 15 kilometres of a rural transfer station (and not covered by the Gisborne city refuse collection area) should have received a recycling bin or blue rubbish stickers. If they haven’t they should contact Customer Services to see if they are eligible.”

In late September 13 blue rubbish stickers were mailed out; however, there were meant to be 17 in the envelope, says Dwayne Pomana, Gisborne District Council’s Solid Waste Engineer. “This would have allowed for one sticker, on one bag of rubbish, each week until the January rates invoice is mailed out. We included the missing four stickers in with the latest rates invoice. Ratepayers get four stickers this time and then the normal 13 in January. Council apologises for any confusion this has caused,” said Mr Pomana.

Recycling bins have made it easier to recycle. Recycling ensures all the resources used in packaging etc have another life. School children in rural areas have learnt how every time they throw a drink can into the rubbish it lasts for up to 500 years. Every can that they have ever put into a rubbish bag is still in the ground and will be for a long time to come.

The sticker system has changed the way people in Ruatoria are dealing with their waste. The kerbside rubbish and recycling collection has been used by a lot more people.

Over 1000 people have attended composting workshops in the rural communities and their new compost bins are turning kitchen and garden waste into a natural plant food for their gardens.

Those who have a great idea about how to reduce waste in our district should apply for funding. Funding of up to $10,000 is available for new waste minimisation projects. Application forms are available on Council’s website.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
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