Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Council Votes To Keep Town Hall

Council Votes To Keep Town Hall

22 November 2012

Christchurch City Council today voted unanimously to retain and repair the entire Town Hall complex to 100 per cent of New Building Standards (NBS).

The Council, after seeking input from Sir Miles Warren and Maurice Mahoney who were present at the meeting, also agreed that there may be opportunities to redesign an improved southern entry to the Town Hall, from the Avon River Park. This could mean changes to Boaters and the Limes and Cambridge rooms and would be considered as part of ongoing planning before the Council makes a final decision.

As part of this year’s Annual Plan process, which considered the future of the Christchurch Town Hall and other major community facilities, the Council asked staff to prepare a report which would evaluate the merits of retaining the Town Hall main auditorium only and developing a new entrance and gathering space, provided the overall acoustic quality and sense of place associated with the Town Hall could be retained. That report was presented to the Community, Recreation and Culture Committee last month and considered by the Council today.

Mayor Bob Parker says there was an overwhelming call from the community to keep the entire complex.

“Retaining the Town Hall was a key part of the draft plan this Council prepared for the rebuild of our Central City, based on the community’s input to the Share an Idea campaign. This vote will inevitably create some challenges for us and for the Christchurch Central Development Unit around location of performing arts facilities in the Central City, but this building is too important for us to lose.

“Christchurch’s Town Hall has been cherished by Cantabrians of all ages and we all have fond memories of special occasions and events held there. We have been lucky today to hear directly from Sir Miles Warren, Maurice Mahoney and Sir Harold Marshall on the importance of keeping the facility in its entirety. This is a good decision for the city.”

As part of the Annual Plan 2012/13 process the Council budgeted $127.5 million to repair the Town Hall to 100 per cent of New Building Standards based on estimated costs. Insurance cover for the complex is estimated at $68.9 million, however discussions with insurers are ongoing and have not yet been finalised. The Council has already budgeted to borrow the residual $58.6 million. This debt will be serviced through the one-off increase of 1.84% for major community facilities included in the 2012/13 Annual Plan.

Council’s General Manager Corporate Services Paul Anderson says the estimated cost of repair is greater than estimated insurance cover because the Council is planning to do a lot more work on the building to bring it up to 100 per cent of new building code.

“For example, significant work will be required to repair and strengthen the Town Hall's foundations due to the extent of land damage in the vicinity.

“Unlike your usual household insurance, which can be based on open-ended replacement value, our facilities are covered to a set value based on repairing to building regulations of the day - which right now is 33 per cent of new building code. The Council has said this is not good enough for the city's major community facilities where children, families, residents and visitors live, work and play. They have seen the damage that earthquakes can cause and want to build strong, reliable facilities for the community. This does come at an extra cost. The Council's insurance policy was based on the technical advice of professional valuers before the earthquakes; the repairs we are considering as part of the earthquake rebuild deliver a lot more than what's covered by insurance,” Mr Anderson says.

The full report considered at today’s meeting can be viewed online by clicking here.
ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Departure Speech: Governor-General’s State Farewell Luncheon

"...Unfortunately I was unable to get to the Antarctic, the Chatham Islands and the Kermadecs. A dicky heart thwarted our travel to the Antarctic; and even though I volunteered to parachute into the Kermadecs to join the Young Blake expedition, time, commitments and officials frustrated my plans to visit the Kermadecs and Chathams." More>>

ALSO:

New Research: Most Homeless People Working Or Studying

“The cost of housing has been rising without corresponding increases in income, whilst the number of state houses per capita has been in decline. Many low-income people are missing out on housing, whether we recognise them as ‘homeless’ or not. More>>

ALSO:

Post-Traynor: New Offender Info Sharing Plan

“This Bill delivers on that step-change by moving away from name-based records held by individual agencies to a shared, anchor identity based on unalterable information, such as fingerprints and facial recognition. It also gives agencies access to the drivers’ licence photo database and birth, death and marriages information." More>>

  • NZ Law Foundation - New $2M fund for research on information challenges
  • Littoral: New Ship To Deliver Enhanced Naval Capability

    Defence Minister Gerry Brownlee says the Government has approved a Ministry of Defence and New Zealand Defence Force recommendation to request tenders for a new naval ship to support littoral operations. More>>

    July:

    After King's Labour Snub: Māori Party And Kiingitanga To Work Together

    Māori Party Co-leaders Te Ururoa Flavell and Marama Fox met with Kiingitanga representatives in Wellington yesterday to discuss working together on key issues for the betterment of Māori. More>>

    ALSO:

    Waitangi Claim On Rehabilitation: The 'Justus' System For Māori Not Good Enough

    Closing statements at the Waitangi Tribunal case against Corrections called for immediate steps and a comprehensive review to address the high rate of Māori reoffending. More>>

    ALSO:

    Advice: PM Sets Rules For Ministers' Treatment Of Public Servants

    Prime Minister John Key has laid down the law about the way ministers and public servants should interact, saying ministers may not always like the advice they receive, but they must listen to it carefully, respectfully and professionally. More>>

    Gordon Campbell: On The Funding Changes In Special Needs Education, And Uber

    The plan to strip out the educational support for older “special needs” children in order to meet the existing shortfall in funding for special needs in early childhood education is so miserly and relentlessly stupid as to defy belief… More>>

    SPECIAL EDUCATION (& More):

    Online Learning Plans:

    Get More From Scoop

     

    LATEST HEADLINES

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Regional
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news