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Fun with fencing and futsal at the ASB Sports Centre

NEWS RELEASE

25 January 2013

Fun with fencing and futsal at the ASB Sports Centre

Local youngsters looking to learn new sports skills will be excited to hear about two great new coaching clinics – for futsal and fencing – on at Wellington’s ASB Sports Centre during the first school term this year.

Futsal is a South American variant of indoor football played in a smaller area than usual with a small, low-bounce ball. While it might be unfamiliar to many New Zealanders, it’s actually the world’s fastest growing indoor sport – and it’s now both FIFA and New Zealand Football’s approved version of five-aside football.

ASB Sports Centre Manager Craig Hutchings says futsal can be an invaluable tool for the development of creative young footballers. “This is a sport that’s been cited by football greats like Pele, Ronaldhino and Lionel Messi as key factors in their development. It’s a great way to rapidly improve one-touch passing, ball-control skills and quick-thinking.”

The nine-week coaching programme is being run by Capital Futsal, with sessions on Tuesdays and Sundays during term one (19 February until 16 April).

Tuesday sessions will run from 4–5pm (with classes for girls only, and a mixed programme for children aged 7–10); on Sundays the clinics will run from 9.30–10.30am, with mixed classes split between children aged 4–6 and 7–10.

The cost is $67.50 for the whole term – with casual $8 sessions available if space allows. To book, go to www.Wellington.govt.nz or phone the ASB Sports Centre on 830 0500.

If futsal doesn’t appeal to your child – why not suggest they have a go at fencing?

The upcoming 10-week junior fencing programme at the ASB Sports Centre is the perfect introduction to this age-old sport and kids will have a chance to learn from Commonwealth Games gold medallist Ping Yuan.

According to Ping, fencing is a competition of physical strength, courage and stamina – for the brain and the body. “It suits kids who like to be challenged in their thinking, and those who don’t want to run after a ball. In fencing, you'll often find the kids who haven't found their niche in other sports.”

As well as representing New Zealand at the highest level, Ping is an international coach and in 2011 received Fencing New Zealand Federation’s coach of the year award. She wants to use her experience and knowledge to introduce young people to fencing and help them attain the success and enjoyment she has gained from the sport.

Ping’s coaching sessions will be on at the ASB Sports Centre every Thursday during term (4–5pm, 14 February–18 April) and open to young people aged up to 16. Sessions cost $10 and places are strictly limited. For further information or to book, phone Ping on 021 059 2558 or 567 4984 or email rainbowfencing@hotmail.com

ends

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