Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Rena Recovery Newsletter – Issue 8

Rena Recovery Newsletter – Issue 8


Happy New Year to all and here is the first update of 2013!

We have had many students working over the summer holidays collecting samples across the coastline. The Department of Conservation has reported that wildlife programmes are progressing well with no inconsistencies. Our monitoring team is shifting focus to Otaiti where they have confirmed elevated levels of contaminants. Also in this issue read about research into clean-up techniques and also an assessment of impact on mauri.
Click here to download a print friendly version

Further sampling at Astrolabe Reef a priority for scientists
Further sampling is a priority for Rena Recovery scientists who have confirmed there are elevated levels of contaminants close to the Rena wreck on Otaiti.

The Rena Recovery monitoring team has recently gained greater access to the reef following over a year of dangerous salvage operations restricting access. The team is now working hard to determine the significance of the contaminants, including any impact on marine life around the reef, and the best approach to address those impacts.
University of Waikato Chair of Coastal Science, Professor Chris Battershill said that it had been expected that contaminants would be found at the ship wreck site and they are now working directly with the salvors to access the reef to collect more samples.
“Sediment samples have shown elevated levels of contaminants including copper and PAHs (polyaromatic hydrocarbons) which are known contaminants that were lost to sea from the Rena and its cargo.
“While we only have limited sampling information at this point, early indications are that the contamination is localised,” Professor Battershill said.
Click here to read the full article

Assessing the best techniques to clean up oil
This is a key question being asked as part of Rena Recovery research.

When reports started coming in of a potential oil spill, the Maketū community pulled together to decide on a clean-up process and what technique to use if oil were to wash ashore.
More than 14 months later, those choices made in the early days are now being analysed and studied to be able to better understand what clean-up techniques have proved to be most effective in the New Zealand environment.

Researcher Tania Gaborit and science student Summa Newdick are assessing the effectiveness of the spill sorb product used to remove from the rocks at the Maketū estuary and out to Ōkurei.
The studies are testing how well the ecology around the rocks has recovered since being covered in oil and cleaned up by the spill sorb product. This programme will be brought together with research being undertaken at Mount Maunganui where different techniques were used, including hot-water washing and scraping.
All the field work is complete for the Maketū team and they are now working on pulling all the data results together and developing some experiments.
Pia Bennett, Environmental Officer for Ngāti Makino Iwi Authority in Maketū said that the work was a great exercise that would have long-term benefits.
“We are really thrilled to see this work being done. Most of all we are excited to see that the next generation of scientists are getting the opportunity to gain real world experience.
“Summa Newdick is connected to our iwi here in Maketu and while she is developing her science skills and providing valuable research for the programme, it is special that she is also practicing her role of kaitiakitanga (guardianship).”

Join us on Facebook
Get the latest updates and see any new pics on our Facebook site -
www.Facebook.com/RenaRecovery

Understanding the impact on mauri
One Rena Recovery programme is assessing the impact the Rena grounding has had on mauri
As part of the Mātauranga Programme, Maketū iwi are carrying out an assessment of mauri, which is the life supporting capacity of an ecosystem (including its people) and including metaphysical attributes. The assessment will evaluate how the Rena grounding has had an effect on mauri.
Pia Bennett, Environmental Officer for Ngāti Makino Iwi Authority is leading this project which has required a huge amount of effort.
“It is not an easy process to assess mauri. Each area has its own identity and different iwi who are connected to that land.”
“We are doing an assessment focused on our land which is the Maketū region. Mauri is best measured only by mana Whenua (people of the land) of each area. While we are only able to assess a small region, our research will be shared with all iwi so everyone can learn from the process undertaken.”

Click here to read the full article

Dive survey assessment of the stern section and remaining cargo completed
An update from the Rena owners and insurers
A dive survey to conduct an external visual assessment of the Rena’s sunken stern section and its cargo has now been completed.

Early indications from the surveys suggest that of the 36 remaining containers in the stern section carrying known contaminants, many have broken up and their contents have escaped since the vessel broke in two and sank.

Three containers, with cargo intact, were recovered; four were retrieved but were empty; another seven were recovered in pieces; the contents of the remaining 22 are presumed lost at sea.

Captain John Owen of The Swedish Club said: “We have scientists from the Cawthron Institute working with the Rena Recovery Monitoring team to undertake further sampling and testing of water and sediment samples.

“This will then confirm possible solutions to remediate contaminated areas, currently known to be in close proximity to the wreck.”
Click here to read the full article

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Gordon Campbell: On What John Key Should Be Asking Joe Biden

No doubt, US Vice-President Joe Biden will be updating Prime Minister John Key on the chances of a TPP vote taking place in the ‘ lame duck’ session of Congress that’s held between the November’s election and the inauguration of a new President in January. More>>

ALSO:

Make NZ Make Again: Greens Will Establish A Minister For Manufacturing

The Green Party announced today that it will establish a Minister for Manufacturing in Cabinet, to better represent the interests of manufacturers and ensure they thrive. The Minister will be inside Cabinet and have responsibility for the long-term interests of the manufacturing sector. More>>

ALSO:

Cannabis Party: Treasury Figures On Cost Of Criminalisation

Figures released by Treasury prove the economic viability of The Cannabis Party's policy, while destroying the credibility of police claims about cannabis harms. More>>

ALSO:

Green Party: Investigation Into Mental Health Facilities Shows Disarray

The Health Minister must urgently launch an inquiry into mental health services, after serious issues with the standard of care at mental health and disability facilities around the country were revealed today, the Green Party said. More>>

ALSO:

Apparently He Means 'Years 0-8': Seymour Announces 4th Partnership Schools Application Round

“The continuing growth of this policy reflects the achievement of the eight existing Partnership Schools, and the strong levels of interest educators and community leaders are showing in the Partnership Schools model and what it offers students and their families,” Mr Seymour says. More>>

ALSO:

Trust Directors: Urban Māori Win Case Against Te Ohu Kai Moana

The National Urban Māori Authority (NUMA) and Te Waipareira Trust have succeeded in their claim over a $20 million trust set up for the benefit of urban Māori, meaning all directors of the trust must represent Māori who are not affiliated with an iwi. More>>

New Model: Carbon Tax Could Lower Emissions And Boost Economy

A carbon tax targeting emissions-intensive industries, along with a revamped Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS), could boost economic growth, with the extra tax generated used to cut GST from 15 percent to 12.5 percent. More>>

ALSO:

Budget Docs Release: ACC Sought $158mn In Budget 2016, Got $26.4mn

The Accident Compensation Commission requested an extra $158 million in funding for 2016/17 from the government ahead of Budget 2016, but Treasury instead recommended an interim payment of just $26.4 million be funded to tackle demographic changes, papers published by the government show. More>>

ALSO:

Submissions Sought: Māori Party Joins Opposition Housing Inquiry

People who are homeless, those who were once homeless, those working with the homeless and concerned New Zealanders are being asked to share their experiences and solutions to this growing issue with the Cross-Party Homelessness Inquiry. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news