Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Nation’s position on moving summer holidays revealed


For immediate release

31 January 2013



Nation’s position on moving summer holidays revealed

Almost a quarter of New Zealand adults want to move the traditional summer holiday period to February, according to new data* from Tourism Bay of Plenty.

Twenty-four per cent of respondents say they would prefer to move the traditional New Zealand summer break, including the school holidays, to February when the weather is generally better. However a larger group of 38% are against the proposition, with an equal number undecided.

Settled weather unsurprisingly plays a big part in holiday enjoyment with 40% of Kiwis saying that wet weather is their ultimate peeve while on summer holiday. Twenty percent felt traffic was the most irritating.

Tourism Bay of Plenty general manager Rhys Arrowsmith says talk of moving the summer holiday period surfaces every year and the research demonstrated New Zealanders’ mixed feelings on the issue.

“Although the weather in February is generally excellent, this year we’ve been lucky with periods of settled and sunny weather in many parts of the country over the Christmas and New Year period as well,” he says.

“In the coastal Bay of Plenty we have the most sunshine hours in the North Island, and we see many tourists coming to the area for a better chance of sunshine than they’d get elsewhere.

“Whether you’re on a beach holiday, camping in national parks or on a road trip, no one likes being outside in the rain,” he says. “But there are plenty of indoor activities in most regions to keep both the adults and the kids entertained.”


Other findings in Tourism Bay of Plenty’s research include:

Favourite activity on summer holiday
• The beach (including swimming and sunbathing) – 34%
• Enjoying food and wine – 21%
• Reading – 12%
• Doing nothing – 12%
• Water sports (including waterskiing, windsurfing, yachting, fishing, boating) – 9%
• Traditional sports (including golf, cricket, hockey, walking, hiking) – 5%
• Electronic entertainment (e.g. TV, movies, computer, smartphone, tablet) – 4%
• Cultural activities (including art galleries, theatre) – 3%

Favourite smell of Kiwi summer
• The beach / sea air – 32%
• A barbecue – 30%
• Freshly cut grass – 17%
• Summer flowers – 11%
• Christmas tree – 7%
• Sun tan lotion – 3%

Favourite sound of Kiwi summer
• Waves on the beach – 42%
• Dawn chorus (birds) – 19%
• Running stream / river – 16%
• Cicadas – 15%
• The slap of water against a boat – 8%


ENDS

*Survey conducted by Research Now, 11 – 17 December 2012.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Sugar: Auckland Leisure Centres Axe Unhealthy Drinks

Auckland Council is to stop selling drinks that are sweetened by sugar from vending machines at its leisure centres in a bid to try to reduce obesity and type 2 diabetes... More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Todd McClay’s Faulty Memory

Time and again, whenever an issue arises the initial response by government is to deny or diminish the problem – nothing to worry about here, everything’s OK, move on. Then, hang on. In line with the usual pattern, as embarrassing details emerged into daylight, the story changed. More>>

ALSO:

Labour's 'Future Of Work': Major Reform Of Careers And Apprenticeships

The next Labour Government will transform careers advice in high schools to ensure every student has a personalised career plan, Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little says. More>>

ALSO:

State Investments Management: Treasury Likes IRD, Not Education Or Corrections

The Inland Revenue Department has scored an 'A' in the first tranche of the Treasury's investor confidence rating for state agencies that manage significant Crown investments and assets, gaining greater autonomy as a result, while the Corrections and Education ministries gained a 'C' rating. More>>

ALSO:

Govt Goal: NZ To Be "Predator Free" By 2050

Prime Minister John Key has today announced the Government has adopted the goal of New Zealand becoming Predator Free by 2050... “That’s why we have adopted this goal. Our ambition is that by 2050 every single part of New Zealand will be completely free of rats, stoats and possums." More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The IOC’s Treatment Of Russian Sport, And Lone Wolf Terrorism

A blanket ban on Russian athletes would also have exposed the IOC to criticism that its treatment of Russia would have been marked contrast to its treatment say, of the track and field team from Kenya – a country about which the IOC has very similar doping concerns. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news