Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Water shortage prospect as Wellington's great summer continues


Media release

21 February 2013

Water shortage prospect as Wellington’s great summer continues

Extra watering restrictions look increasingly likely as Wellington’s great summer continues. The latest regional weather forecast predicts little rain on the horizon for the next 14 days. If that outlook proves accurate then water use is likely to rise – a scenario that could see a water shortage.

The rivers that provide about two-thirds of the water supply for Upper Hutt, Lower Hutt, Porirua and Wellington remain at low levels and are dropping – that means less water can be taken each day for supply. Although rainfall has been average or above average over the past couple of months, it has been infrequent. This means that any rainfall runs off the ground and down the rivers quickly, resulting in only short-lived increases in river levels.

During the last spell of fine weather, approximately 100 million litres (ML) of water was being supplied from the rivers each day to help meet the increase in overall demand. Currently 130ML of water per day is available in the rivers, but without a good amount of rain in the water catchments soon, that number could drop to 100ML within the next 1-2 weeks.

Nigel Wilson, Greater Wellington Regional Council’s Social and Cultural Wellbeing Committee Chairman, says the next few weeks will be crucial for water supply.

“What happens over the next couple of weeks – in terms of water use and how the weather forecast develops – is important. We need extra care from the community over the next few weeks to keep water use to a minimum, so what we’ve got available goes further,” says Cr Wilson.

“If the rivers can’t supply what’s needed, we’ll have to ask for a ban on garden sprinklers and irrigation systems. We’d also have to rely more heavily on the Hutt aquifer and look at activating a consent to take more water from the Hutt River at Kaitoke.”

While water is normally held in two storage lakes at Te Marua to supplement low river flows, only one of the lakes is available this summer as the other is being earthquake-strengthened. This stored water becomes increasingly important for meeting essential water needs as our rivers dwindle, so it must be managed carefully to ensure there’s enough to last in the event of a very long, dry spell.

Councillor Wilson says it’s important that people continue to take care with water. “Water use to date this summer has been quite restrained given the weather conditions, which is good news, but we need that extra degree of care from the public to continue – at least until a more regular rainfall pattern returns.”
Water saving tips:
• Use a flow control trigger on hoses
• Target watering close to the ground, at a rate the soil can absorb
• Put off non-essential outdoor jobs, like washing windows or the car, until autumn

For more water saving tips visit http://www.gw.govt.nz/water


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Post-Traynor: New Offender Info Sharing Plan

“This Bill delivers on that step-change by moving away from name-based records held by individual agencies to a shared, anchor identity based on unalterable information, such as fingerprints and facial recognition. It also gives agencies access to the drivers’ licence photo database and birth, death and marriages information." More>>

  • NZ Law Foundation - New $2M fund for research on information challenges
  • Littoral: New Ship To Deliver Enhanced Naval Capability

    Defence Minister Gerry Brownlee says the Government has approved a Ministry of Defence and New Zealand Defence Force recommendation to request tenders for a new naval ship to support littoral operations. More>>

    July:

    After King's Labour Snub: Māori Party And Kiingitanga To Work Together

    Māori Party Co-leaders Te Ururoa Flavell and Marama Fox met with Kiingitanga representatives in Wellington yesterday to discuss working together on key issues for the betterment of Māori. More>>

    ALSO:

    Waitangi Claim On Rehabilitation: The 'Justus' System For Māori Not Good Enough

    Closing statements at the Waitangi Tribunal case against Corrections called for immediate steps and a comprehensive review to address the high rate of Māori reoffending. More>>

    ALSO:

    Advice: PM Sets Rules For Ministers' Treatment Of Public Servants

    Prime Minister John Key has laid down the law about the way ministers and public servants should interact, saying ministers may not always like the advice they receive, but they must listen to it carefully, respectfully and professionally. More>>

    Gordon Campbell: On The Funding Changes In Special Needs Education, And Uber

    The plan to strip out the educational support for older “special needs” children in order to meet the existing shortfall in funding for special needs in early childhood education is so miserly and relentlessly stupid as to defy belief… More>>

    SPECIAL EDUCATION (& More):

    Online Learning Plans:

    Post Cab Presser: Inquiries And Consciences

    This afternoon the Prime Minister John Key announced that his cabinet had drafted terms of reference for the Havelock North water contamination inquiry... In response to questions on the Shop Trading Hours Amendment Bill, the Prime Minister said he didn't think allowing National MPs a conscience vote was warranted. More>>

    ALSO:

    Statistics, Homelessness, Privacy: Auckland City Mission Data Joins Govt Research Database

    For the first time, data from an agency outside government, Auckland City Mission, will be included in Statistics New Zealand’s vault of information for researchers. Data from the Auckland City Mission is going into the “Integrated Data Infrastructure” or IDI. More>>

    Get More From Scoop

     

    LATEST HEADLINES

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Regional
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news