Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Investigations into shipping lane options to be carried out

Investigations into shipping lane options to be carried out

21 February 2013

Further investigation into the options for managing shipping movements in Bay of Plenty waters will be carried out by Bay of Plenty Regional Council in coming months, following a report to its Strategy, Policy and Planning Committee Meeting on Tuesday.

The use of compulsory shipping lanes in the region has been a discussion topic for the Council since the Rena grounding in October 2011 on Astrolabe Reef. At Tuesday’s meeting it was decided that more work was needed to explore all the options available to council, and the risks and logistics.

Committee Chair Raewyn Bennett said staff would now begin the work to look at what those possible options could be for the region.

“With the recent history of the Rena grounding and because we have New Zealand’s largest export port in Tauranga, we realise this is an important issue for our residents,” she said. “Because of that we want to make sure any future decisions made about the management of shipping routes are the best for the region. We also want to make sure we’re addressing the concerns that our local residents have been making to us, including iwi and hapū, about coastal shipping and acknowledging the support many of them have given to us for this work.”

Ms Bennett said staff have been asked to link in closely with Maritime New Zealand and the Ministry of Transport to ensure the council is taking an overarching view of the issue, especially where it may have implications that are broader than just the Bay of Plenty.

“The work done to date to look at the options has raised questions about where this type of regulation would best sit – whether that be at a local, national or international level.”

Currently the Regional Council does have some responsibility for navigation safety within the region’s waters, which extend to 12 nautical miles offshore. They are controlled at a regional level by the Bay of Plenty Navigation Safety Bylaws 2010, which include specific navigation requirements for vessels entering the Tauranga and Whakatāne harbours, and enable the regional council to establish exclusion zones, but do not include compulsory shipping lanes.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Parliament: Labour And Greens Sign Historic Agreement

The Labour Party and the Green Party have announced today they have signed an historic agreement to work cooperatively to change the Government. The Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the parties commits them to working cooperatively to change the Government including closer work at parliament and a possible joint policy announcement or campaign. More>>

ALSO:

Green Party: Suspend Charter Schools, Not Students

Most of the annual reports of the Partnership Schools already opened have been published today... Some schools had unacceptably high rates of suspensions and expulsions, and about half failed to meet all their agreed targets. More>>

Christchurch Rebuild: 'Third Strike For Brownlee From Treasury'

Gerry Brownlee should be hugely embarrassed that Treasury has given the central city recovery its third fail grade in a row, amidst revelations of further delays to the stalled convention centre project, says Labour’s Canterbury spokesperson Megan Woods. More>>

Professor Ian Shirley: The Budget That Failed Auckland

The 2016 budget offered Auckland nothing in the way of vision or hope and it continued the National Government’s threats against the Auckland Council. Threatening the Council with over-riding its democratic processes if it fails to release land for housing is a bullying tactic aimed at diverting attention away from the fundamental problems with housing in the region. More>>

ALSO:

Plain Packs Plan: Gordon Campbell On Tobacco Politicking (And The TPP Death Watch)

Has Act leader David Seymour got the easiest job in the world, or what? Roll out of bed, turn on the radio and hmm…there do seem to be a lot of problems out there in the world. Must think of something. And so it came to pass that this morning, David Seymour took up his sword and shield to fight for a world that’s about to be denied the rich and vibrant beauty of tobacco advertising. More>>

ALSO:


RECENT TPP MEETING:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news