Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


After Busy 24 Hours Coastguard Urges Boaties: Take More Care

Media Release
22 February 2013

After A Busy 24 Hours Coastguard Urges Boaties To Take More Care

At 2151 hours last night Coastguard’s Operations Centre received a phone call from a man reporting his brother and two friends over due from their fishing trip.

The three men left Half Moon Bay at 1600 hours yesterday in their 14.5 foot boat advising they would return by 2100 hours that night. There was no report of lifejackets or marine communications on board. It was when the older brother hadn’t received a phone call to pick them up that he raised the alarm.

After numerous attempts by Coastguard’s Operations Centre to contact them via cell phone, at 2300 hours Coastguard volunteers from Howick were tasked to search for the missing boaties and at 0033 hours Coastguard North Shore were also tasked to join the search. They worked with Westpac Helicopter and Police helicopter ‘Eagle’ who searched through the night.

At 0433 hours, Coastguard’s Operations Centre received a text message from one of the boaties advising that they were safe and tied up to a jetty in Matiatia Bay, Waiheke. All assets were stood down.

The search covered the inner and outer islands and channels in the Hauraki Gulf with Coastguard alone having expended 45 man hours in the search.

Mark Leevers, Duty Officer for Coastguard Northern Region, says “this is a classic case of the unnecessary use of resources due to lack of communication from boaties”.

Coastguard takes this opportunity to remind people of the importance of carrying two forms of waterproof communication on board and familiarising themselves with Coastguard’s marine VHF channels before heading out on the water.

“We can only do so much. Coastguard volunteers are out there dedicating their time and risking their lives to save others. People need to make sure they are looking out for themselves and that means taking all the necessary safety equipment on board and telling someone where they are going, when they will be back and advising any changes to the trip.”

--

About Coastguard Northern Region:

Coastguard is the charity that provides New Zealand’s primary maritime search and rescue service. The organisation operates from a network of four regions and 71 affiliated units, located around the coastline and major lakes of New Zealand. Coastguard’s Northern Region covers the area from Thames across to the Mokau River and everything north and is based at the Auckland Marine Rescue Centre (AMRC) in Mechanics Bay. Each year the operations room at the AMRC receives over 100,000 VHF marine radio calls.

Coastguard’s Northern Region however more than daring rescues at sea. Generations of dedicated people have established an organisation that provides a wealth of services to every person using our harbours and beaches.

• Provides a 24 hour a day, 365 days a year service.
• Install and maintain VHF radio repeaters throughout the Northern Region to enable mariners to communicate with each other over long distances.
• Install and maintain buoys and beacons to make recreational boating safer.
• Provide a 24 hour continuous weather forecast on marine radio VHF channels 20, 21, 22 and 23.
• Accept trip reports from any vessel able to make radio contact.
• Provide a range of boating education courses to ensure that boaties have a sound knowledge of their boats and the rules of the road at sea.

Coastguard’s Northern Region Maritime School gives boaties the skills they need for a safe and enjoyable time on the water. They have a range of theory-based and practical (RYA) courses available. These are aimed at encouraging people to get to know the boating rules and regulation whilst gaining the skills and experience to keep safe.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Parliament Today:

Urban & Rural: $303m To Merge And Modernise New Zealand’s Fire Services

Internal Affairs Minister Peter Dunne today announced funding of $303 million over five years to combine urban and rural fire services into one organisation from mid-2017. More>>

ALSO:

High Trust Regime: What Did The PM Tell His Lawyer About Foreign Trusts?

The Government stopped the IRD from reviewing New Zealand foreign trusts shortly after the Prime Minister’s lawyer wrote to the Revenue Minister claiming John Key had promised him the regime would not be changed. More>>

ALSO:

Road Crime: Wicked Campers Vans Classified As Objectionable

The definition of publication includes any "thing that has printed or impressed upon it, or otherwise shown upon it, 1 or more (or a combination of 1 or more) images, representations, signs, statements, or words", The Classification Office has previously classified such 'things' as billboards, t-shirts, and even a drink can. This is the first time the Classification Office has classified a vehicle. More>>

ALSO:

'When New' Repairs: Landmark EQC Settlement

The Earthquake Commission has cut a deal with 98 Canterbury homeowners that affirms the government entity's responsibility to repair earthquake-damaged property to a 'when new' state, as well as covering repairs for undamaged parts of a property and clarifying its position on cash settlement calculations. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Kiwirail’s Latest Stint In The Dogbox

The denigration of Kiwirail continues. The latest review (based on a 2014 assessment) of the options facing the company have enabled Kiwirail to be hung out to dry once again as a liability and burden on the taxpayer. More>>

ALSO:

Royal Society Report: Good Opportunities To Act Now On Climate Change

There are many actions New Zealand can and should take now to reduce the threat of climate change and transition to a low-carbon economy, a report released today by the Royal Society of New Zealand finds... More>>

ALSO:

Paris Climate Deal Signed: Bennett 'Taking Advice' On Cancelling 'Dodgy' Credits

Climate Change Minister Paula Bennett is "taking advice" on whether to cancel some or all of the so-called 'dodgy' carbon credits bought mainly by power and petrol companies to cover New Zealand's future obligations to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases that cause climate change. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news