Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Wellingtonians remain upbeat through tough times


Wellingtonians remain upbeat through tough times

Wellington City’s new quality of life survey confirms what Wellingtonians already know – Wellington is a tolerant, inclusive, proud, vibrant and safe city.

Reflecting the overall New Zealand mood of recent years, Wellington is less positive than two years ago – but respondents agree that it’s still a great place to live.

Mayor Celia Wade-Brown says that through the tough economic climate Wellington has seen smaller drops than other centres in key quality of life indicators. “We anticipated this survey could reflect the prevailing uncertainty but Wellingtonians remain more positive about their prospects compared to people in other centres.”

The biennial Quality of Life survey measures the perceptions of over 5000 residents living in four of the country’s largest urban areas. Conducted by research company Nielsen, the survey is jointly funded by the participating councils, and is part of the wider Quality of Life in New Zealand’s Largest Cities project.

Local authorities that participated in the quality of life survey were Auckland Council, Hutt, Porirua, Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin city councils.

Wellington’s positive results were seen across a wide range of areas – from personal happiness and health to civic pride, to acceptance of diversity and use of public transport. Wellington was particularly strong in its enthusiasm for its arts scene.

Notable results for Wellington were:

88% report their overall quality of life positively.
30% feel their quality of life has improved over the past 12 months.
78% are satisfied or very satisfied with their life (higher than the average across the six cities).
95% feel safe in their homes after dark.
75% feel safe walking in their neighbourhood after dark.
65% feel safe in the CBD after dark (considerably higher than the six-city average).
75% believe an increasing number of people with different lifestyles makes Wellington a better place to live (significantly higher than other cities).
89% feel the city has a culturally rich and diverse arts scene.
93% agree Wellington is a great place to live.
86% feel a sense of pride in the city.
39% are frequent users (two or more times a week) of public transport (nearly twice as high as the six-cities average).
84% believe our public transport is safe to use and 87% believe it’s easy to get to.


Direct comparisons with previous years’ figures are problematic because the survey methodology has changed from phone-based to online surveys. Researchers know that such a change makes people likely to answer less positively.

Mayor Wade-Brown says that, as in previous years, good results should be balanced by acknowledging there is still work to be done.

“Perceptions about the affordability of public transport are still an issue – only 44% of people believe our public transport is affordable. Affordability is obviously a key concern to people in these challenging economic times.”

The other real concerns that emerged from the survey were alcohol and drugs, and graffiti or tagging – 71% believe alcohol/drugs are a problem in Wellington, while 78% feel graffiti/tagging is a problem.

“Our own recent research showed there’s a perception of too much drunkenness in the city, and we’re working on an alcohol management strategy to address that. It’s a complex issue – New Zealand’s drinking culture is under the spotlight and we need to take action at a local and national level.”

Survey respondents also reported feeling less confident in Council decision-making. Nevertheless, Wellington’s levels of confidence are higher than Auckland or Christchurch – and above the six-city average.

“More real engagement with people from suburbs, the inner-city and with business must be a greater priority and we’ll make a start with better Annual Plan consultations and we’re developing a new online ‘peoples panel’.”

Mayor Wade-Brown says “Wellington’s rich arts scene and cultural variety continue to be a source of pride. Wellington has long been acknowledged as the arts capital. It’s a city where creativity flourishes, and where people want to live, work and play.

“The international recognition the city received late last year with the win in the UN-endorsed International Awards for Liveable Communities, or LivCom, reflects our liveability.”


ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

'Tea Break Bill' Passes: Gordon Campbell On Bad Labour Laws And Poor Safety

By co-incidence, one of the prime dangers of the government’s new employment relations law has been underlined by the release of the death and injury statistics among workers at New Zealand ports. These are highly profitable enterprises for the port owners.

The Port of Tauranga for instance, is expecting its current full-year profit to be between $78 million and $83 million and other ports are enjoying similar boom times – but they are also highly dangerous places for the people who work on or around the port premises. At the Port of Tauranga, there have been 26 serious accidents since 2011, and two deaths. More>>

 

Parliament Today:

No Charges: Outcome Of Operation Clover Investigation

Police have completed a multi-agency investigation, Operation Clover, into the activities of a group calling themselves “The Roast Busters”. The 12 month enquiry focused on incidents involving allegations of sexual offending against a number of girls in the Waitemata Police district and wider Auckland area... More>>

ALSO:

UNICEF Report: NZ Cautioned On "Stagnating" Child Poverty

An international report by UNICEF has found that child poverty rates in New Zealand have barely changed since 2008, despite similar sized countries significantly reducing child poverty during the recent recession. More>>

ALSO:

Funding Report: Two Pathways For Transport In Auckland

Commissioned by Auckland Council, the group was asked to investigate two possible pathways for raising $300 million per year ($12 billion over 30 years) to pay for the improvements needed to help fix Auckland’s transport system. More>>

ALSO:

Pay Equity: Equal Pay Win In Court Of Appeal

CTU: The Court of Appeal has made a historic decision paving the way for a substantial equal pay claim for aged care workers. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The TPP Finishing Line, And Amazon’s Woes

If the Trans Pacific Partnership trade deal wasn’t such a serious matter, this would be pretty funny… More>>

ALSO:

TV3 Video: Three Die On Roads Over Labour Weekend

The official holiday period ended at 6am Tuesday, with three deaths on the roads during the Labour Day weekend. More>>

Employment Relations Bill: Govt Strains To Get Tea Break Law Through

The Government has been left with egg on its face - failing to get its much-vaunted, but hugely unpopular, meal break law passed in the first week of its new term, Labour spokesperson on Labour Issues Andrew Little says. More>>

ALSO:

Guns: Police Association Call To Arm Police Full Time

"The new minister gave his view, that Police do not need to be armed, while standing on the forecourt of parliament. The dark irony was that the interview followed immediately after breaking news of a gunman running amok in the Canadian parliament in Ottawa..." More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news