Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Love Your River Water Education & Awareness Campaign

28 February 2013

Love Your River Water Education & Awareness Campaign

Palmerston North City Council is launching an education campaign aimed at improving the health of the city’s water ways.

Sustainable and economic development project coordinator William van Ausdal says the aim of the Love Your River campaign is to highlight the link between river health and water use.

“We want everyone to understand the link and take action to improve the health of our rivers and the wider environment.”

William van Ausdal says 80% of nutrients enter water ways from agricultural, natural and urban runoff, however phosphorus from point sources (commercial, industrial and domestic use) are a significant source of the total load.

Research shows that up to 30% of phosphorus in domestic waste water derives from domestic laundry products, dishwashing detergents and food scraps (DEFRA 2008).

William van Ausdal says there are a number of ways for waste water treatment plants to remove phosphorus including chemical and biological treatments. However this is at considerable cost, something which Palmerston North City Council is experiencing at present.

“By shifting consumer habits towards phosphorus-free detergents and composting food scraps, we have the potential to reduce phosphorus loads to waste water treatment plants, the load in the treated discharge and reduce operational costs.
The ‘Love Your River’ campaign includes:

• Practical tips that promote the reduction of excess nutrients in storm and waste water including:
o Keeping food debris out of drains and composting instead.
o Promoting the use of phosphate-free laundry and dishwashing products.
o Washing cars on the lawn.
• DIY Liquid Laundry Detergent Workshops, educational videos (shown at Downtown Cinemas).
• Reusable billboard signage.
• Messaging delivered directly from retailers on supermarket aisles.

William van Ausdal says the project is borne out of the Council’s Sustainable City Strategy which identifies the health and extent of native biodiversity on land and in water as a priority for the city.

Research shows that urban New Zealand streams are amongst the most nutrient enriched waterways in the country. While other research shows that up to 30% of phosphorus in domestic waste water derives from domestic laundry products, dishwashing detergents and food scraps.

“We know that the excessive supply of nutrients such as phosphorus and nitrogen is strongly linked to the growth of plants, algae, blooms of cyanobacteria, odour problems, and health issues.”

William van Ausdal says the campaign is in no way intended to mitigate the investigation into the effects of the Totara Road Waste Water Treatment Plant discharge into the Manawatū River. “Instead, it is hoped it will support efforts to improve the condition of treated waste water and thereby the health of our river.”

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Gordon Campbell: On The Ombudsman’s Verdict On Paula Rebstock And Ian Rennie

Unfortunately, the brave and damning report by Ombudsman Ron Paterson on the “flawed” and “unfair” inquiry conducted by Dame Paula Rebstock into events at MFAT pulls back the veil on a far wider issue. More>>

ALSO:

Charities' Report: Stressed Families - Overstretched Services

“Like so many of the whānau and families they serve social service organisations are under huge financial stress. The support demanded from desperate people in communities is far outreaching the resources available.” More>>

ALSO:

Detention: Wellingtonians Protest Treatment Of Refugees

Peace Action Wellington (PAW) and around 50 Wellingtonians blockaded the Australian High Commission, creating a symbolic detention centre to protest the Australian Government's policy of mandatory offshore detention for refugees and asylum seekers. More>>

ALSO:

Diver's Alarums: Breach Means Training Provider Must Repay $1.47 Million

The New Zealand School of Outdoor Studies is to repay $1.47 million (GST-exclusive) to the Tertiary Education Commission (TEC) following an investigation which showed that some student enrolments between 2009 -2014 could not be validated and that courses were under-delivered against their agreement with the TEC. More>>

ALSO:

Education: Government Plans Suggest Bulk Funding Return

Plans by the Government to return to bulk funding are likely to see increased class sizes and schools most in need missing out on much-needed resources, Labour’s Acting Education spokesperson Grant Robertson says. More>>

ALSO:

Interim Report: Auckland Looks Long Term To Pay-Per-Km Road Pricing

Aucklanders can expect to be paying variable rates per kilometre to travel on the city's most congested roads under an emerging transport strategy being formulated by the government and the Auckland Council. More>>

ALSO:

Despite Promises: Government Extends Iraq Deployment

Cabinet has agreed to extend New Zealand’s contribution to the joint New Zealand-Australia mission to train Iraqi Security Forces until November 2018. More>>

ALSO:

On The 'Terrorism' Card:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news