Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Call For National Languages Policy A Step In Right Direction

Media release: COMET Auckland

10.00am - March 5 2013

Call For National Languages Policy Is A Step In Right Direction

A Language dies every 14 days: Not here, not on our watch

The Royal Society of New Zealand has released a paper on Languages in Aotearoa New Zealand, and key stakeholder COMET Auckland is taking the opportunity to support the paper’s call for a national languages policy.

Susan Warren, Chief Executive of COMET Auckland, a charitable trust and CCO aiming to advance education for Auckland, says the Royal Society’s paper is a valuable step to getting language promotion and preservation on the national agenda.

“Around the world, a language becomes extinct every 14 days. As education and skills advocates, and as Aucklanders, COMET Auckland says: not here, not on our watch. We are heartened to see the Royal Society make such a strong, evidence-based call for action in this area because it is high time there was a more cohesive national approach to looking after languages and ensuring they can thrive.”

“We constantly see the impact that the current lack of language support has on families across Auckland. Our Māori, Pasifika and migrant populations bring a richness of language strengths which could be contributing more to our educational and economic wellbeing as a city. As the Royal Society has highlighted, for monolingual students there may be education benefits across the board when they learn a second language, and there are cognitive improvements for children raised bilingually– in a country that needs increased equality and equity in education, isn’t this worth exploring further?

“From our perspective, language is critically important to the improvement of education and skills. In response to the Royal Society’s paper, we are working with the Human Rights Commission and others to develop an Auckland languages policy, to bring coherence to the many efforts to support language in our city.

“Once the Auckland languages strategy is in full swing, we anticipate that other regions will see the value in taking a formal stance on protecting languages and make moves to develop their own strategies. Of course, if there was to be a national policy, this would provide both the scale and legislation needed to ensure language is a country-wide priority.”

Warren says it is her hope that the Royal Society’s paper will make Government take notice of the importance of languages in Aotearoa, and move to formally adopt a nationwide policy.

“While we are fortunate that more than 160 languages are spoken in New Zealand, and that Auckland is one of the most culturally diverse cities in the world, the importance of language is not yet being given the priority it needs, so the Royal Society’s paper is certainly a step in the right direction.”

You can read COMET Auckland’s submission to the Royal Society of New Zealand on Languages in Aotearoa HERE, the submission on the Public Inquiry into Pacific Languages in ECE HERE and the submission on the review Ka Hikitia HERE.

He Karanga nui mō te

“Ture Mō Ngā Reo Katoa o te Motu. He Takahitanga ki te Aratika”
Mate noa tētehi reo ia 14 o ngā rā: Kaare i konei: kaare i tā mātou tirohanga


Kua tukuna he pūrongo "Languages in Aotearoa NZ" e "The Royal Society of New Zealand", ā, ka tautoko kaha a COMET Auckland tā rātou karanga mō "Te Ture Mō Ngā Reo Katoa o Aotearoa"

Ko Susan Warren te Tumuaki o COMET Auckland me tō rātou whāinga ki te kokiri mātauranga mō Tāmaki Makaurau te kī nei, he tino pūrongo kia kokiri te whakaaturanga me te tiakitanga o ngā reo katoa ki te motu whānui.

"Huri noa i te ao ka mate tētehi reo ia 14 o ngā rā. Hei kaikokiri o te mātauranga, hei iwi noho o Tāmaki Makaurau, nā COMET Auckland te kī, kaare i tā mātou tirohanga. Ka manawanui atu te kitenga atu i te 'Royal Society' e mau kaha ana i ngā tatauranga kia kokiri ake te take nei, a, kua tae te wā kia whakakotahi ai te kokiri kia tiaki pai ngā reo katoa ka ora pai ai."

"Ka kitea ngā pānga tūkino o te kore tautoko i te reo ki ngā whānau o Tāmaki Makaurau. Ka mauria mai te Māori, ngā iwi o te moana nui a Kiwa, ngā iwi manene i ngā hua o ngō rātou reo, ā ka taunaki pai ai ngā hua o Tāmaki Makaurau.

Kua whakakāngia e te pūrongo he painga mō te hunga e mohiotia ana ki te reo kotahi, kia ako i tētehi reo anō, ā, he pikinga hoki o te hinengaro mā te hunga i tupu ake i ngā reo e rua. inapea he whāinga pai mō tātou?

"Ki tā mātou tirohanga, ko te reo he tino take kia whakapai ake te mātauranga me ngā pūkenga o te tangata. He putanga ake o te pūrongo, e mahingātahi ana mātou me te 'Human Rights Commission', me ngētehi atu kia whanake he ture reo mō Tāmaki, ka tuitui ai te tautokoranga o ngā reo ki Tāmaki Makaurau."

"Ka tutuki te rautaki reo mō Tāmaki Makaurau, ka whai muri ngētehi atu rohe, ka kitea te wariu o te turanga nei kia tiaki i ngā reo, a ka whāia ngō rātou ake rautaki. Mēnā he ture reo mō te motu, ka whakaratohia te whānui, te hohonutanga me te ture ka whakatairanga ake ngā take reo ki ngā tōpito o te motu."

Nā Warren te tūmanako, mā te pūrongo te Kāwanatanga e mau i ngā hua o ngā reo mō Aotearoa, ā, ka whakaturehia.

"Waimarie tātou hakitemea 160 o ngā reo kōrerotia ki Aotearoa, ko Tāmaki Makaurau tētehi o ngā taone ahurea rerenga kē o te ao, kaare anō te take o ngā reo kia eke, nā te pūrongo anō he aronga ki te aratika"

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell:
On The Northland By-Election

Supposedly, Winston Peters’ victory in Northland has exposed the simmering dissatisfaction with the government that exists out in the provinces. Yet it remains to be seen whether this defeat will have much significance – and not simply because if and when Labour resumes business as usual in the Northland seat at the next election, Peters’ hold on it could simply evaporate.

On Saturday, National’s electorate vote declined by 7,000 votes, as the 9,000 majority it won last September turned into a 4,000 vote deficit – mainly because Labour supporters followed the nod and wink given by Labour leader Andrew Little, and voted tactically for Peters. In the process, Labour’s vote went down from nearly 9,000 votes six months ago, to only 1,315 on Saturday. More>>

 
 

PARLIAMENT TODAY:

Climate: Ministers Exclude Emissions From ‘Environment Reporting'

The National Party Government has today revealed that the national environmental report topics for this year will, incredibly, exclude New Zealand’s greenhouse gas emissions, the Green Party said today. More>>

ALSO:

No Retrial: Freedom At Last For Teina Pora

The Māori Party is relieved that the Privy Council has cleared the final legal hurdle for Teina Pora who was wrongfully convicted of murder and sent to prison for 22 years. More>>

ALSO:

Germanwings Crash: Privacy Act Supports Aviation Safeguards In New Zealand

Reports that German privacy laws may have contributed to the Germanwings air crash have prompted New Zealand’s Privacy Commissioner to reassure the public that the Privacy Act is no impediment to medical practitioners notifying appropriate authorities to a pilot’s health concerns. More>>

ALSO:

Treaty: Taranaki Iwi Ngāruahine Settles Treaty Claims For $67.5mln

The settlement includes a $13.5 million payment the government made in June 2013, as well as land in the Taranaki region. The settlement also includes four culturally significant sites, the Waipakari Reserve, Te Kohinga Reserve, Te Ngutu o te Manu and Te Poho o Taranaki. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On A Funeral In Asia, The Northland By-Election, And News Priorities

Supposedly, New Zealand’s destiny lies in Asia, and that was one of Foreign Minister Murray McCully’s rationales for his bungled reforms at MFAT. OK. So, if that’s the case why didn’t Prime Minister John Key attend the state funeral on Sunday of Singapore’s founding leader Lee Kuan Yew? More>>

ALSO:

Werewolf Satire: Not Flag-Waving; Flag-Drowning

The panel choosing the flag options has no visual artists at all. Now, I’ve kerned the odd ligature in my time and I know my recto from my French curve so I thought I’d offer a few suggestions before they get past their depth. More>>

ALSO:

IPCA Reports: Significant Problems In Police Custody

In releasing two reports today, the Independent Police Conduct Authority has highlighted a number of significant problems with the way in which Police deal with people who are detained in Police cells. More>>

ALSO:

Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security: Inquiry Into GCSB Pacific Allegations

The complaints follow recent public allegations about GCSB activities. The complaints, and these public allegations, raise wider questions regarding the collection, retention and sharing of communications data. More>>

ALSO:

TPPA Investment Leak: "NZ Surrender To US" On Corporates Suing Governments

Professor Jane Kelsey: ‘As anticipated, the deal gives foreign investors from the TPPA countries special rights, and the power to sue the government in private offshore tribunals for massive damages if new laws, or even court decisions, significantly affected their bottom line’. More>>

ALSO:

Werewolf: The Myth Of Steven Joyce

Gordon Campbell: The myth of competence that’s been woven around Steven Joyce – the Key government’s “Minister of Everything” and “Mr Fixit” – has been disseminated from high-rises to hamlets, across the country... More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news