Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Permits needed for all but gas fires in Gisborne district

8 April 2013

Permits needed for all but gas fires

The total fire ban for the Gisborne district will be lifted at 8am on Wednesday (10 April 2013) but a restricted fire season is still in place. Recent rain has helped the situation but the district is still dry, says principal rural fire officer René Londeman.

A restricted fire season means a permit from the Gisborne District Council is needed before any fires can be lit. This applies to hangis and umus. Only gas barbecues and gas cookers are exempt.

If people light a fire without a permit they face fines of up to $2000.

“By issuing a permit we have a record of where fires will be lit and can make sure that the conditions are right so that it can burn safely,” Mr Londeman said.

“Those who light fires in the open are responsible for making sure the fires are safe and do not spread. Even if you light a fire with a permit or use a gas barbecue, it’s still your responsibility if it gets out of hand. You will be charged for all costs associated with extinguishing the fire. This could be in the tens of thousands of dollars.”

“Fires should never be lit when conditions are windy, or strong winds are forecast,” he said. “In these conditions a small fire can spread very rapidly. In isolated parts of the district, an awful lot of damage occurs while waiting for help to arrive.”

Issuing a permit is not automatic it depends on whether the fire can burn safely. Gisborne District Council acting as a Rural Fire Authority issues permits. It can take up to three days to check applications, particularly if a site inspection is required. Permits can be applied for on the Council’s website www.gdc.govt.nz or from Customer Service in Fitzherbert Street or Te Puia Springs.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Earth Day: Global March To Defend Science In NZ Saturday

The March for Science movement emerged in the immediate wake of President Trump’s inauguration as he moved quickly to curtail the power of the Environmental Protection Agency and limit the ability of government agencies to communicate scientific evidence.

Since then it has broadened to “champion robustly funded and publicly communicated science as a pillar of human freedom and prosperity”. More>>

'Opening The Election' Video: Nicky Hager And Mike Joy On Science, Spin, And Society

In two videos relevant to the March for Science from Scoop's 'Opening The Election' forum, Massey University's Dr Mike Joy spoke about promoting science in the face of government spin and journalist Nicky Hager offered a checklist of issues to promote for an open civil society. More>>

 

Health Workers Respond: People's Mental Health Report Released

The People's Mental Health Review reinforces a recent YesWeCare.nz survey of 6,000 health workers, which found nine in 10 believe they don't have the staff or resources to deliver the care Kiwis need when they need it. More>>

ALSO:

More Mental Health:


Energy: Greens Launch Plan For Cheaper And Cleaner Electricity

$112 million for winter warm-up payments to help low-income households cover their power bills • setting a goal for 100 percent renewable electricity by 2030 (in average hydrological conditions) • an investigation into the electricity wholesale market. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Aged-Care Settlement

Until yesterday, a National government has always been the sworn enemy of women seeking justice in the workplace, in the face of gender-based pay discrimination. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news