Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Coastal watch needed as pressures grow

10 April 2013

Coastal watch needed as pressures grow

Increasing pressure on Waikato’s coastal environment will need to be managed carefully, particularly on the Coromandel Peninsula, Waikato Regional Council’s resource use and environmental monitoring committee has heard today.

Currently the council spends about $4 million a year on managing and monitoring the health of the marine environment in the region.

Reports on coastal estuarine environments to today’s committee meeting said Thames, Whitianga and Whangamata were all expected to grow strongly.

“In the next 30 years the population of Auckland will also have increased by one million and so the holiday population on the Coromandel, which already swells to five times the usual size, will grow accordingly,” a report said.

The Coromandel was often referred to as the playground of the Waikato, Auckland and beyond but “increasing development pressures” highlighted the need for its “management and protection” for a range of “economic, cultural, recreational and environmental reasons”.

The reports said the council has a work programme underway to identify what needs to be done to protect the coastal area in light of these increasing pressures.

Currently, harbour and catchment plans are in place for Whangamata and Wharekawa, and one is under development for Tairua and Pauanui. These plans are designed to reduce sediment and nutrients from getting into the coastal marine area where they can degrade water quality and harm aquatic life. This can have a negative impact on tourism.

The council is also closely monitoring the environmental impacts of land-based activities, such as farming and forestry, in the southern Firth of Thames and Raglan Harbour on the west coast. Tairua-Pauanui monitoring is due to start next financial year. This monitoring will provide the council with information on changes in the marine environment and help determine future work programmes.

The council has been putting in place resource consent conditions to ensure that discharges into the sea from stormwater systems and wastewater treatment plants are of a high standard. Consent conditions covering activities such as farming, forestry and industry are also designed to help protect the marine environment. For example, discharges from outlets such as factories and wastewater plants into the Waihou River, which flows into the Firth of Thames, have been significantly reduced over the last 10 years.

The reports indicated the council should ideally be able to do more management and monitoring work over time and that this could be considered as more funding became available.

“A lot of work is being done in co-operation with other agencies to plan for the way we will manage the coastal environment going into the future,” said coast and marine programme manager Dr Peter Singleton.

“Staff will provide further information to councillors on potential work programmes once the joint planning we’re doing points a clearer way ahead.”

The committee agreed that looking at the question of more funding for future work in this area was warranted.

Committee chair Lois Livingston said after the meeting that the information presented in the reports highlighted significant economic, environmental and recreational issues.

“We all know our coastal spaces are valuable environments in their own right and provide important economic and recreational benefits to our communities, and those of neighbouring regions.

“Given the growth being anticipated in our coastal communities, and the growing populations of cities like Auckland and Hamilton, it will be crucial to ensure we do what we can to protect our coasts.”

The Waikato Regional Council

The council’s area extends from the Bombay Hills in the north to Mt Ruapehu in the south, and from the mouth of the Waikato River to Mokau on the west coast, across to the Coromandel Peninsula on the east.

The region contains nationally important electricity generation facilities, an internationally significant dairy sector and iconic natural features, such as Lake Taupo, which are key tourist attractions.

The council has three key strategic goals:
• The values of land and water resources are sustained across the region
• The people of the region collaborate to achieve a shared vision of the Waikato competing globally, caring locally
• The Waikato Regional Council meets its legislative co-governance requirements by working together in good faith and a spirit of co-operation

Our wide-ranging responsibilities include:
• sustainable management of natural and physical resources, including pest control.
• planning regional growth and transport, and providing bus services.
• civil defence, emergency response, navigation safety, dam safety, flood management, erosion control and road safety.

Visit us on Facebook www.facebook.com/waikatoregion

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell: On Journalism’s Future In The Era Of “Alternative Facts.”

Already, the White House has made it clear that the media are the new enemy that the new President’s supporters will be encouraged to unite against. (What else can they do now they don’t have Hillary Clinton to demonise any more?)

The fantastic phrase “alternative facts” coined by Trump spinmeister Kellyanne Conway captures the media strategy in a nutshell. More>>

 

Employment: Minimum Wage To Increase To $15.75

The minimum wage will increase by 50 cents to $15.75 an hour on 1 April 2017... The starting-out and training hourly minimum wage rates will increase from $12.20 to $12.60 per hour, remaining at 80 per cent of the adult minimum wage.More>>

ALSO:

Housing: Sit-In Occupation To Stop Niki’s Eviction

The Tāmaki Redevelopment Company hopes to issue a Possession Order for 14 Taniwha Street, Glen Innes. This will give them the ability to forcibly evict Ioela ‘Niki’ Rauti who has lived at 14 Taniwha Street for 21 years... More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Bill English, Abroad

If David Cameron was the closest thing John Key had to a political mentor, their successors also share a whole lot in common. Theresa May and Bill English were both propelled into the top jobs as the result of unexpected resignations, and without much in the way of credible competition from their colleagues... More>>

ALSO:

Pike River: Labour Bill To Override Safety Act For Mine Entry

“Bill English has been hiding behind the legal excuse that any attempt to re-enter the mine to recover the bodies might place the mine’s owner, Solid Energy Limited, and its directors in breach of the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015." More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Populism And Labour 2017

For many people on the centre-left, populism is a dirty word, and a shorthand for the politics of bigotry. In this country, it has tended to be equated with the angry legions of New Zealand First. Who knew they were not just a reactionary spasm, but the wave of the future? More>>

Oxfam: 30% Of NZ Owns Less Wealth Than Our Two Richest Men

The research also reveals that the richest one per cent have 20 per cent of the wealth in New Zealand, while 90 per cent of the population owns less than half of the nation’s wealth. The research forms part of a global report released to coincide with this week’s annual meeting of political and business leaders at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news