Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Toxic Mining and Deep Sea Oil Exploration Off Northland

Toxic Mining and Deep Sea Oil Exploration Off Northland: ‘Don’t Even Think About It!’

Whangarei, Friday 3 May: Today te Wakameninga o nga hapu Ngāpuhi and Forest and Bird say the Government are offering the worst options for Northland’s future with a large dollop of spin. Representatives reacting to the opening of tenders for deep sea oil off Northland’s west coast are warning mineral exploration companies and deep sea oil interests “Don’t even think about it!”

“The Government are pushing all the worst options for Northland’s future with their obsession of toxic mining and deep sea oil drilling” says Bryce Smith for te Wakameninga o nga hapu Ngāpuhi. “If they get their way, in a few years we’ll have dams with millions of tonnes of toxic waste upstream from productive coastal areas and farms and the potential of oil on our beaches.”

“Manipulative attempts by Steven Joyce aimed to force this on Northland is appalling (1). The Tasman Sea is turbulent. There are a history of shipwrecks and drownings all along the west coast of the country. It is no place for deep sea oil rigs. We have our own ideas about the future of the north and it doesn’t come from that strange space between Steven Joyce’s ears,” says Mr Smith.

“Any Northland deep sea oil drilling would be serviced out of Taranaki, which also makes their local job figures very suspect”, says Mr Smith. “Mike Sabin is unrealistically talking up jobs and income too. He acts as if the huge risks are not there with corporations that have dangerous track records like Anadarko from Texas (2),” says Mr Smith.

“This Government have low standards and ethics. They let international oil and mining interests write laws so weak you could drive an oil tanker through them. That’s why it’s we must draw the line even though they recently passed a law to take away people’s right to protest at sea,” says Mr Smith.

The northern branches of Forest and Bird have been opposing toxic mining plans across Northland after the area was surveyed in 2011 without consent of landowners then marketed to mining companies across the globe.

The Government announced this week that the toxic waste dam at the old Tui Mine site near Coromandel has finally been stabilised. Taxpayers have had to pay $22.5 million to clean it up (3).

“The toxic waste from gold mining that includes mercury, cadmium and arsenic at the old Tui Mine site has been stabilised for now, but the toxic waste will continue to be a threat forever. Why create it in the first place? Nearby the Te Aroha mine had five years of mining, leached for 40 years and cost us $40 million to clean up as well,” says Dean Baigent-Mercer, Chairperson of the Far North branch of Forest and Bird. “Let’s not repeat these mistakes in Northland”.

This week Whangarei MP Phil Heatley has said exploration company De Grey Mining would be held to account over monitoring water during gold and silver exploration over Puhipuhi (4).

“Phil Heatley has missed the important points,” says Mr Baigent-Mercer. “One is that if mercury and other heavy metals turn up in sampling, the damage is already done and it’s really difficult to contain the contamination and if you do, where do you put it? Also the Northland Regional Council have a shocking record for monitoring any consents and are worst in the country for enforcing dairy farming breaches (5). In this case the NRC aren’t even sure if De Grey Mining need a consent to drill through rock and aquifers where contaminants could mix with the water that come out around the mountain as springs.”

(1) http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=10880660
(2) http://werewolf.co.nz/2013/05/risky-business/
(3) http://beehive.govt.nz/release/225-million-tui-mine-clean-complete
(4) ‘Mining Opponents on High Alert in North’ http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/morningreport/20130501
(5) http://www.forestandbird.org.nz/what-we-do/publications/media-release/northland%E2%80%99s-dairy-farmers-fail-discharge-targets

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Labour: Healthy Homes Bill Passes First Reading

Some of New Zealand’s most vulnerable children and families are on their way towards safer living conditions with the passing of the first reading of the Healthy Homes Guarantee Bill in Parliament last night, Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little says. More>>

ALSO:

Werewolf Satire: Home, And A Way

The one thing even more popular than an Auckland house is offering advice on how to afford an Auckland house. So, on the grounds it can’t be worse than some of the stuff that’s out there, here’s my three cents* worth. [*Up 50% since 2013!] More>>

ALSO:

Werewolf: The Defence Pretence

Last year, the world began spending more money on weapons again, for the first time since 2011... New Zealand belongs to a region – Asia and Oceania – where military spending rose sharply in 2015, by 5.4 per cent. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Not Crying Foul, Argentina

So a couple of guys found to be criminally liable of environmental pollution in Argentina lodge an application with the Overseas Investment Office… in order to buy some prime New Zealand rural land. Seems that their factory back home had carelessly and/or intentionally discharged toxic waste into the Lujan river. Bummer... More>>

ALSO:

Urban & Rural: $303m To Merge And Modernise New Zealand’s Fire Services

Internal Affairs Minister Peter Dunne today announced funding of $303 million over five years to combine urban and rural fire services into one organisation from mid-2017. More>>

ALSO:

High Trust Regime: What Did The PM Tell His Lawyer About Foreign Trusts?

The Government stopped the IRD from reviewing New Zealand foreign trusts shortly after the Prime Minister’s lawyer wrote to the Revenue Minister claiming John Key had promised him the regime would not be changed. More>>

ALSO:

Road Crime: Wicked Campers Vans Classified As Objectionable

The definition of publication includes any "thing that has printed or impressed upon it, or otherwise shown upon it, 1 or more (or a combination of 1 or more) images, representations, signs, statements, or words", The Classification Office has previously classified such 'things' as billboards, t-shirts, and even a drink can. This is the first time the Classification Office has classified a vehicle. More>>

ALSO:

'When New' Repairs: Landmark EQC Settlement

The Earthquake Commission has cut a deal with 98 Canterbury homeowners that affirms the government entity's responsibility to repair earthquake-damaged property to a 'when new' state, as well as covering repairs for undamaged parts of a property and clarifying its position on cash settlement calculations. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Kiwirail’s Latest Stint In The Dogbox

The denigration of Kiwirail continues. The latest review (based on a 2014 assessment) of the options facing the company have enabled Kiwirail to be hung out to dry once again as a liability and burden on the taxpayer. More>>

ALSO:

Royal Society Report: Good Opportunities To Act Now On Climate Change

There are many actions New Zealand can and should take now to reduce the threat of climate change and transition to a low-carbon economy, a report released today by the Royal Society of New Zealand finds... More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news