Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Aucklanders oppose Government saying where to build houses


1 July 2013


Aucklanders oppose Government saying where to build houses


Nearly seven out of 10 Aucklanders think their council should decide where new housing development in Auckland takes place, not central Government, according to a new survey.


56.2% also believe the Government should not have special powers, provided for in a bill introduced under urgency to Parliament after the May Budget, to override the role of councils in deciding where housing development should take place.


An overwhelming 74.9% of Auckland adults would prefer the Auckland Council and the Government to agree on fast tracked housing development areas, rather than have the Government acquire special powers to override the Auckland and other councils.


The thumbs down to the special powers proposed in the Housing Accords and Special Housing Areas Bill come from a June 13 to 26 Horizon Research poll of 1026 Aucklanders aged 18+. Weighted to represent the Auckland adult population the poll has a maximum margin of error of +/- 3.1%.


The bill is now being considered by a parliamentary select committee. If passed it would enable the Government to strike "housing accords" with councils to fast track consents for housing development within Special Housing Areas.


The Government's aim is to streamline the planning process and quickly free up land for new housing. The Government says this will help make housing more affordable.

Consents would be approved within 60 to 130 days. They would allow applications for developments with up to six storey buildings and for developments which are currently prohibited in current or proposed plans.


They may be on rural land outside current urban boundaries. Neighbours "adjoining" (next to) the proposed developments will be notified of applications if there is more than a minor impact. Neighbours "adjacent", say living across the road, will not be told.


The bill, as sent to the select committee says the Government or a council in who have reached a housing accord may resign from it giving 30 days' notice. If a council resigns, or refuses to enter an accord, the Government can continue to operate the special housing authority which can approve resource consent applications.

Councils will have to provide new services and infrastructure for the newly consented developments in a timely way though developers with consent will not be required to undertake the development quickly.


The new law will also give the Government a new power to change environmental protection and planning law by regulation - without referring law changes back to Parliament.

Opponents of this, like the Law Society, say this is "contrary to the rule of law and good legislation principles". Some say it will lead to slum developments. Planning rules cover issues like protecting coastal areas, water quality and other amenities of value in local areas.


The Government argues such powers would be used as a last resort and are needed to make sure enough new housing is provided quickly enough to meet demand, especially in Auckland.

The law will be automatically fully repealed by 2017.


The Horizon poll finds 68.5% of Aucklanders are also opposed to the Government, through regulation, being able to change planning and consent law affecting housing developments in your city at any time without referring changes back to Parliament.
ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Bullish On China Shopping: Trade Minister On Premier's Visit

Q+A: Trade Minister Todd McClay – not ruling out a conversation around Chinese workers coming to New Zealand to work on infrastructure projects as part of trade talks:

‘Yeah, well, that’s not something that’s on the table at the moment, but, look, what we’ve agreed as part of the, you know, when we start the upgrade negotiation, both sides can raise issues that are of importance to them. We’ve got a list of things we want to talk about. China may well have.’ More>>

 

Little Heading For Court: Apology Over Donation/Hotel Contract Claims Not Accepted

Today I want to publicly apologise unreservedly to Mr Hagaman for any hurt, embarrassment or adverse reflection on his reputation which may have resulted from my various media statements. I have offered that apology to the Hagamans. More>>

ALSO:

Biscuit Tin Of Democracy: World Heritage Site Protection, Ombudsman and Equal Pay Bills Drawn

On Thursday, 23 March 2017 three places are available on the Order Paper for the first reading of a Member’s bill. The ballot was held, and resulted in the following bills being drawn... More>>

ALSO:

Emissions Plan: NZ Needs More Science, More Trees, Fewer Beasts

A combination of technology breakthroughs, much more plantation forestry, and a big switch away from pastoral, particularly dairy farming, are identified as the key elements of any approach New Zealand takes to reducing its carbon emissions to a net zero level, according to a new report sponsored by the New Zealand chapter of GLOBE, a multi-party, global parliamentary grouping. More>>

ALSO:

"Backed To Win Seats": Labour Māori Seat MPs Won't Stand On List

The Labour Party is backing a request from its Māori seat MPs to stand as electorate MPs only, says Labour Leader Andrew Little. More>>

OutsKey: John Key's Valedictory Speech

I rise to address this House for the very last time. It has been a huge privilege to have served the people of Helensville as their member of Parliament, and, of course, the people of New Zealand as their Prime Minister. More>>

ALSO:

Productivity Commission: New Models Of Tertiary Education Are Coming

The report is a broad-ranging inquiry into how well New Zealand’s tertiary education system is set up to respond to emerging trends in technology and the internationalisation of education, and changes in the structure of the population, and the skills needed in the economy and society... More>>

ALSO:

PM's Press Conference: Water Everywhere

Monday's Post-Cabinet press conference focused on water, with the Prime Minister fielding questions about the possibility pricing water taken for export. Mr English said the government was directing their water allocation technical advisory group to include export water in considerations. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news