Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Bayleys’ National Sevens Rugby to be family-friendly event

News Release 
Thursday 9 January 2014

Bayleys’ National Sevens Rugby to be family-friendly event

The 2013 Bayleys’ National Sevens Rugby competition at the Rotorua International Stadium on Saturday and Sunday(January 11 and 12) is offering more to families than a special discounted entry price.

Bay of Plenty Rugby Union chief executive Mike Rogers said today that planning for the Bayleys’ National Sevens had from the outset been focused on bringing the entertainment of the fast-growing Sevens game specifically to a family-based audience.

“We want patrons to be aware of the special provisions that we’re putting in place to cater for mums and dads, young people and the whole whanau,” he said. “We’re going to create a relaxed, safe, family festival environment for everyone to enjoy.”

“A supervised dedicated children’s play area is being set up on the grassed area at the end of the main field, with a bouncy castle, waterslide for youngsters under 14, face painting, and even the opportunity for kids to get involved in making a costume to support their own team.

Mr Rogers said there would be a liquor ban in place for car park areas and surrounding streets, which police would enforce.

“We’re also looking after families by allowing them to bring non-commercial food from home into the stadium so as to help keep down their costs of attending.” 

With the introduction of Rugby Sevens into the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympic Games the Bayleys’ National Sevens competition takes on greater importance than ever before, and for the first time will include an eight team women’s competition.”

This year’s event will be the biggest yet with 26 teams in total representing 16 different provinces across the country. Teams competing in the competition have had to earn entry through regional competitions held throughout New Zealand over recent months.

Rotorua District Council’s Events and Venues general manager, Peter McLeod, said tickets to the stadium would allow patrons to enjoy either the warm summer weather on the grassed banks or open terraced seating area, or on shaded grandstand seating at no extra cost.

“Patrons are asked to hold on to their tickets so they can be scanned and used for re-entry if they leave the stadium during the course of each day.

“We have ample parking available at the International Stadium. Motorists coming from the north and the city area are advised to enter car park areas from Thiebe Street while those coming from the south are best to take the Devon Street West entrance,” said Mr McLeod.

Gates open daily at 11.30am with play commencing at noon and the last game scheduled for 7.30pm. The main field and the stadium’s Number 2 field will be in use each day.

Ticket prices are $35 for a Family Pass (2 adults and up to 3 children under-15), $15 for adults and $5 for children (under-15). Tickets are available from the stadium gate on competition days or in advance from the Ticketmaster outlet at the Rotorua Convention Centre. 

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell:
On The Kim Regime

During the Cuban Missile Crisis, the US had a very clear objective and eventually offered a quid pro quo of the removal of some of its own missiles from Turkey. This time, there’s no clarity about what the US is seeking, or offering.

It hasn’t helped that the US and the global media consistently agree on calling North Korea and its leadership “crazy” and “irrational” and urging it to “come to its senses”. When you treat your opponent as being beyond reason, it gets hard to comprehend what their strategy is, let alone work out the terms of a viable compromise. More>>

 

Recovery: Economic Impact Of Kaikōura Quake Revealed

The report details the impact on small businesses and tourism caused by disruptions to transport infrastructure and the economic impacts... The impact on New Zealand’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) over the first 18 months following the earthquake has been estimated at $450-$500 million. More>>

ALSO:

Human Rights Commission: Urgent Need For Action On Seclusion And Restraint

Chief Human Rights Commissioner David Rutherford says that while the report makes for sobering reading, the focus should now be on how the recommendations can be used to reduce the occurrence of seclusion and restraint in New Zealand and, in circumstances where it is necessary, to improve practices. More>>

ALSO:

CORRECTIONS (March 2017):

SCHOOL SECLUSION ROOMS (2016):

$11bn Capital Spend, New Debt Target: Steven Joyce On Budget Priorities

First, delivering better public services for a growing country – providing all New Zealanders with the opportunity to lead successful independent lives... And finally, we remain committed to reducing the tax burden and in particular the impact of marginal tax rates on lower and middle income earners, when we have the room to do so. More>>

ALSO:

JustSpeak Report: Bail Changes To Blame For New Billion Dollar Prison

In 2013 criminal justice spending was falling and the Government was mulling over what to spend the money on. 3 years later there are 10,000 people in prison and a new billion dollar prison is announced. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news