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Gisborne’s water crisis downgraded - Hose ban still in place

Water Crisis Media Release

Release date: Tuesday 14 January 2013

Gisborne’s water crisis downgraded but hose ban still in place

The emergency is over and Gisborne’s water crisis has been downgraded Gisborne District Council Chief Executive Judy Campbell announced this morning (Tuesday 14 January).

The downgrade comes just seven days after the main water pipeline supplying water from the Mangapoike Dams to the Waingake Water Treatment plant broke after a massive land slide caused by extreme winds.

We are now confident that we will be able to supply enough water to keep up with demand from processing industries as they ramp up production, says Mrs Campbell.  “There is little risk any rationing measures will be required. Small amounts of water are now flowing through the repaired pipeline from the dams into the treatment plant.”

“The dams are quite full for this time of year. When the pipeline is completely repaired we should be able to deliver adequate quantities of water – but we are not there yet.”

“At the moment the water is gravity fed and we are getting flows of around 300m3/hr. We will gradually increase the pressure on the welded section of the pipeline to check for leaks. We are installing five more steel columns to a depth of 6 metres. These are being used to stabilise the pipe. Once they are completed we will start pumping to increase water to flow at full capacity - around 1000 m 3/hour.”

‘We aim for this to happen by Monday 20 January. Until then we need to keep our water use conservative and a total hose ban will remain in place.”

Gisborne people have responded most generously to Council’s request to save water. We needed people to use one third less than they would normally do at this time of year. They have exceeded that target five days in a row. This has made our job and that of our contractors so much easier. Thank you.”

“Now there is no need for people to carry on with severe conservation methods. People can start flushing their toilets and start using their washing machines and dishwashers again. If your plants are looking wilted use a watering can to give them a quick drink. Just don’t use the hose as this is where the greatest amount of household wastage occurs. We want to people to continue to conserve water but not be greatly inconvenienced.”

“This goes for our rural and township residents. Many of those who are not on town supply have started to run very low on water. We have let water carriers know that they can now supply all requests for water to be supplied.”

The total ban on the use of hoses will be reviewed next week.

ENDS

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