Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Motorists warned of frequent changes to Central City traffic

Christchurch motorists are being warned to plan their trips and, where possible, avoid driving through the Central City during peak hours with the major infrastructure rebuild getting underway this year within the four avenues.

“Motorists need to leave early, allow plenty of travel time, combine trips and expect frequent changes to traffic management on busy arterial routes,” says the Christchurch Transport Operations Centre Manager Ryan Cooney.

“One-third of the infrastructure rebuild work has already been completed in the Central City, with 2014 set to be an even bigger year. While everything is being done to keep traffic moving there will be delays.

“Work will begin to ramp up in March/April and will remain steady throughout the year. This makes it critical that everyone takes the time to visit the www.transportforchristchurch.govt.nz website and plans their journey.”

Mr Cooney says motorists will need to be patient as they navigate road works in the Central City.

“We understand delays are frustrating but motorists can also help by following some basic driving principles: be courteous to other drivers, pay attention at lights to ensure better traffic flows, use all lanes available and merge like a zip when required and always turn into the closest lane on one-way streets.

“Observing these basic driving behaviours will actually help with traffic flow and get you to your destination quicker and safely.”

Mr Cooney says each day CTOC will be bringing you the latest information on road works in the Central City at www.transportforchristchurch.govt.nz or tune into CTV where the latest Central City traveller information will screen at 5pm, 6.30pm, 9.30pm, 7am, 8am, 9am and noon.

“Everything possible is being done to keep residents informed of what is happening on the roads; we just need all road users to keep checking our website and stay informed.”

SCIRT General Manager, Duncan Gibb, says there will be more than 40 crews working within the four avenues in March/April. “We are working closely with CCDU, Christchurch City Council and private developers to ensure we complete our work ahead of them.

“Our crews and traffic managers will make every effort to maintain access to business and we in turn encourage residents to go the extra mile to support the retailers operating near SCIRT works sites and the Central City in general.

Christchurch Central Development Unit director Warwick Isaacs says having the rebuilt infrastructure in place is essential for redevelopment of the central city, including construction of anchor projects and private development.

“We’ve already seen a start to building on anchor projects such as the Avon River Precinct and Justice and Emergency Services Precinct and this year we will see construction starting on a number of other keenly awaited projects like the Metro Sports Facility and the new Margaret Mahy Amazing Place playground,’’ Mr Isaacs says.

“We are also seeing private development flourishing, but all of this relies on having reliable infrastructure to connect to.’

“This means a lot of activity and some inconvenience for people, but I know peoples’ patience will be rewarded as they see their fantastic new central city taking shape this year.’’

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell:
On The Kim Regime

During the Cuban Missile Crisis, the US had a very clear objective and eventually offered a quid pro quo of the removal of some of its own missiles from Turkey. This time, there’s no clarity about what the US is seeking, or offering.

It hasn’t helped that the US and the global media consistently agree on calling North Korea and its leadership “crazy” and “irrational” and urging it to “come to its senses”. When you treat your opponent as being beyond reason, it gets hard to comprehend what their strategy is, let alone work out the terms of a viable compromise. More>>

 

Recovery: Economic Impact Of Kaikōura Quake Revealed

The report details the impact on small businesses and tourism caused by disruptions to transport infrastructure and the economic impacts... The impact on New Zealand’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) over the first 18 months following the earthquake has been estimated at $450-$500 million. More>>

ALSO:

Human Rights Commission: Urgent Need For Action On Seclusion And Restraint

Chief Human Rights Commissioner David Rutherford says that while the report makes for sobering reading, the focus should now be on how the recommendations can be used to reduce the occurrence of seclusion and restraint in New Zealand and, in circumstances where it is necessary, to improve practices. More>>

ALSO:

CORRECTIONS (March 2017):

SCHOOL SECLUSION ROOMS (2016):

$11bn Capital Spend, New Debt Target: Steven Joyce On Budget Priorities

First, delivering better public services for a growing country – providing all New Zealanders with the opportunity to lead successful independent lives... And finally, we remain committed to reducing the tax burden and in particular the impact of marginal tax rates on lower and middle income earners, when we have the room to do so. More>>

ALSO:

JustSpeak Report: Bail Changes To Blame For New Billion Dollar Prison

In 2013 criminal justice spending was falling and the Government was mulling over what to spend the money on. 3 years later there are 10,000 people in prison and a new billion dollar prison is announced. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news