Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Kaeo flood risk reduction works progressing well

Kaeo flood risk reduction works progressing well

Work on a $700,000 project designed to reduce some of the worst impacts and risks from the flooding that plagues Kaeo is on schedule and now more than 50 percent complete.

Bruce Howse, Land/Rivers Senior Programme Manager for the Northland Regional Council, says the work on the project began late last year and aims to protect the town from destructive, high-speed floodwater rushing through it.

Mr Howse says while the scheme includes a roughly 1km long network of three-metre high stopbanks, it is not designed (nor intended to) stop flooding from occurring.

“What it is designed to do is to deflect damaging, high-speed floodwaters away from the town with a series of stopbanks and essentially convert it into slow-speed ‘back-water’ flooding.”

Mr Howse says the work – at this stage expected to be finished on schedule at the end of next month – is being funded via a roughly 50/50 split between central government ($386,000) and a targetted rate on approximately 2200 local properties.

He says good progress has been made to date overall, with a several-hundred metre long flood wall on the Whangaroa College grounds complete and scheme drainage and the works’ main stopbank from the Pohue Pa to the college progressing well. A large spillway cut upstream of those works was also about 50% complete.

Mr Howse says collectively, the Kaeo works will slow the speed of future floods and should make them much less damaging and dangerous.

“It’s definitely not a ‘silver bullet’ solution but it will make it easier for residents to protect flood-prone properties with sandbags and other tools like flood shutters.”

“Kaeo is built on a floodplain and has flooded for as long as recorded history. Its position and local geography means a practical and affordable solution to stop flooding from happening competely is simply not possible.”

Meanwhile, Mr Howse says a temporary river crossing for machinery to haul earth across the Kaeo River from the spillway to the stopbanks has also been working well.

“The temporary crossing enables material to be hauled across the river with no unnecessary disturbance to the river bed from machinery movements, preventing sediment from being stirred up and maintaining water clarity.”

Mr Howse says even with grass seeding and tidying up works (which are dependent on favourable weather/ growing conditions) the council still expects the project will be completed on schedule by end of March.

He says the first real test of the banks could happen at any time, but most likely will come during an event where accumulated rainfall exceeds 100 mm in less than 24 hours.


ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Parliament Today:

Werewolf: The Defence Pretence

Last year, the world began spending more money on weapons again, for the first time since 2011... New Zealand belongs to a region – Asia and Oceania – where military spending rose sharply in 2015, by 5.4 per cent. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Not Crying Foul, Argentina

So a couple of guys found to be criminally liable of environmental pollution in Argentina lodge an application with the Overseas Investment Office… in order to buy some prime New Zealand rural land. Seems that their factory back home had carelessly and/or intentionally discharged toxic waste into the Lujan river. Bummer... More>>

ALSO:

Urban & Rural: $303m To Merge And Modernise New Zealand’s Fire Services

Internal Affairs Minister Peter Dunne today announced funding of $303 million over five years to combine urban and rural fire services into one organisation from mid-2017. More>>

ALSO:

High Trust Regime: What Did The PM Tell His Lawyer About Foreign Trusts?

The Government stopped the IRD from reviewing New Zealand foreign trusts shortly after the Prime Minister’s lawyer wrote to the Revenue Minister claiming John Key had promised him the regime would not be changed. More>>

ALSO:

Road Crime: Wicked Campers Vans Classified As Objectionable

The definition of publication includes any "thing that has printed or impressed upon it, or otherwise shown upon it, 1 or more (or a combination of 1 or more) images, representations, signs, statements, or words", The Classification Office has previously classified such 'things' as billboards, t-shirts, and even a drink can. This is the first time the Classification Office has classified a vehicle. More>>

ALSO:

'When New' Repairs: Landmark EQC Settlement

The Earthquake Commission has cut a deal with 98 Canterbury homeowners that affirms the government entity's responsibility to repair earthquake-damaged property to a 'when new' state, as well as covering repairs for undamaged parts of a property and clarifying its position on cash settlement calculations. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Kiwirail’s Latest Stint In The Dogbox

The denigration of Kiwirail continues. The latest review (based on a 2014 assessment) of the options facing the company have enabled Kiwirail to be hung out to dry once again as a liability and burden on the taxpayer. More>>

ALSO:

Royal Society Report: Good Opportunities To Act Now On Climate Change

There are many actions New Zealand can and should take now to reduce the threat of climate change and transition to a low-carbon economy, a report released today by the Royal Society of New Zealand finds... More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news