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Upcoming Public Lectures at Victoria


Upcoming Public Lectures: Institute for Governance and Policy Studies

Evidence for Agile Policy Makers
DATE: Friday, 14 February
VENUE: Victoria University of Wellington, Pipitea Campus, Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre Three, 23 Lambton Quay, Wellington.
TIME: 12:30pm-13:30pm
RSVP: No RSVP required, all welcome


Speaker: Professor Graham Room, Professor of European Social Policy, University of Bath

How can governments choose which policy interventions to use? Can the same methods be used for choosing good policies and good medicines?
Advocates of evidence-based policy-making (EBPM) ask 'what works?' They believe that good policies should involve interventions that have a strong evidence base. They therefore call for careful measurement of the impact of different interventions. This approach has been challenged by Pawson, who argues that a wide range of factors modify how any particular intervention develops. This critique does not however go far enough, because the impact of an intervention also typically depends on the synergies it develops with other interventions. It is from this vantage point that the lecture will reconsider the theory and practice of EBPM.

Professor Room's most recent book is titled 'Complexity, Institutions and Public Policy: Agile Decision-Making in a Turbulent World'. He is also Acting Director of the Institute for Policy Research and the Founding Editor of the 'Journal of European Social Policy' and is a member of the Academy of Social Sciences.

Elder Abuse, Social Ageism and Human Rights
DATE: Tuesday, 18 February
VENUE: Victoria University of Wellington, Pipitea Campus, Government Bulidings, Lecture Theatre One, Corner of Bunny Street and Lambton Quay, Wellington.
TIME: 17.30pm-18:30pm
RSVP: No RSVP required, all welcome


Speaker: Professor Simon Biggs, University of Melbourne

Professor Biggs is a renowned researcher in the areas of dignity in later life and elder protection. His recent research includes a World Health Organisation's Age friendly cities' project; an ESCR study of baby boomers; uses of adaptive technology in later life and a UK National Prevalence Study on elder abuse and neglect.

His current interests include the relationships between social identity and adult ageing, including the analysis of international and national social policy. He is a member of the World Economic Forum's Global Agenda Council on Ageing Societies and this presentation will examine amongst other things, recent findings from the international literature on the prevalence of elder mistreatment and its implications.

Chair: Dr Michael Macaulay, Associate Professor in Public Management, Deputy Director of IGPS, Victoria University of Wellington.

This event is jointly hosted by the New Zealand Association of Gerontology.


Nudge, Budge or Nuzzle: A Workshop on Nudging, Behavioural Economics and Public Policy
DATE: Thursday, 20 February
VENUE: Victoria University of Wellington, Pipitea Campus, Rutherford House, Ground Floor, Lecture Theatre Three, 23 Lambton Quay, Wellington.
TIME: 10.00am -12:30pm
RSVP: No RSVP required, all welcome


Speakers: Professor Martin Lodge, London School of Economics, ANZSOG Visiting Scholar Program at Victoria University of Wellington and Professor Graham Room, Professor of European Social Policy, University of Bath


In recent years 'nudge' has come into fashion, under the inspiration of behavioural economics and, in particular, Thaler and Sustein's widely cited 'Nudge: Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth, and Happiness' (2008).
This workshop will consider the value of 'nudge' as a guide to policy-making. Professor Martin Lodge (London School of Economics) will examine the limits to nudging; Professor Graham Room (University of Bath) will discuss the alternative notions of 'budge' and 'nuzzle'.

There will be plenty of time in the workshop for other participants to contribute their perspectives and their practical experience of policy making.


What is Distinctive in Government Budgeting: A Comparative Multi-Country Political Study
DATE: Friday, 21 February
VENUE: Victoria University of Wellington, Pipitea Campus, Railway West Wing, Level Five, Room RWW501, Bunny Street, Wellington.
TIME: 12:30pm-13.30pm
RSVP: No RSVP required, all welcome

Speaker: Professor Pertti Ahonen, University of Helsinki, Finland

Professor of Political Science. D.Soc.Sc. (Political Science, University of Helsinki, 1984), M.Sc. Econ. (Business Accounting, Aalto University, Helsinki, 1978)

Age Friendly Workplaces
DATE: Friday, 28 February
VENUE: Victoria University of Wellington, Pipitea Campus, Government Bulidings, Lecture Theatre One, Corner of Bunny Street and Lambton Quay, Wellington.
TIME: 12.30pm-13:30pm
RSVP: No RSVP required, all welcome


Speaker: Professor Simon Biggs, University of Melbourne

Following on from Professor Biggs's lecture on the 18th of February, this presentation will examine amongst other things, recent findings from the international literature on the prevalence of elder mistreatment and its implications.

Chair: Professor Jonathan Boston, Professor in Public Policy, Director of IGPS, Victoria University of Wellington.

This event is jointly hosted by the New Zealand Association of Gerontology.

Logo for NZAG
Science and Public Policy
DATE: Friday, 7 March
VENUE: Victoria University of Wellington, Pipitea Campus, Railway West Wing, Level Five, Room RWW501, Bunny Street, Wellington.
TIME: 12:30pm-13.30pm
RSVP: No RSVP required, all welcome

Speaker: Professor Martin Lodge, London School of Economics.
ANZSOG Visiting Scholar Program at Victoria University of Wellington

The relationship between science and politics is a contested one. The notion of 'science-based' policy appeals to those favouring the idea of rational policy-making. However, 'science based' policy fails to acknowledge the different roles that 'science' plays when it comes to policy and politics.

Furthermore, it also does not acknowledge the conflicts within 'science' itself. This paper explores this debate by looking at the most extensive and expansive random control trial in the UK, namely the trial involving badgers in the context of concern about the rise of TB in cattle. The paper highlights the highly problematic nature of the notion of a 'science-based' policy.


Three of a kind? The Emissions Trading Systems of the EU, New Zealand and Tokyo compared
DATE: Friday, 21 March 2014
VENUE: Victoria University of Wellington, Pipitea Campus, Railway West Wing, Level Five, Room RWW501, Bunny Street, Wellington.
TIME: 12:30pm-13.30pm
RSVP: No RSVP required, all welcome

Speaker: Dr Stefan Niederhafner, Assistant Professor, Department of International Relations, Seoul National University

Even though the EU emission trading system (ETS) is the biggest and most active carbon market, it has apparent problems maintaining a stable supply and demand based price mechanism which calls into question its purpose of reducing C0 emissions.

The same problem occurs in New Zealand where prices have fallen dramatically over the past couple of years. Comparing the carbon markets of the EU, New Zealand and Tokyo, Dr Niederhafner will investigate the differences in the designs of the systems, asking if elements can be found that would make carbon trading an actual C0 mitigating enterprise.


Other Items of Interest: SSC and ANZSOG Public Lectures

Risky Business: Can we improve the way government agencies manage risks?
DATE: Monday, 3 March 2014
VENUE: Lambton Room 1& 2, Intercontinental Hotel, 2 Grey Street, Wellington
TIME: 12.00-12.30pm Lunch and Networking and 12.30-1.45pm Presentation with Q&A
RSVP: Registration required, see below:

Speaker: Hanzo van Beusekom, ANZSOG Research Fellow and partner at Clear Conduct

Most public managers join government to make a difference to the lives of our fellow citizens. Managing risk is a crucial factor in working towards this goal. However, risk management can become mechanistic and short sighted.

It doesn't have to be this way. Risk management is an exciting craft that requires creativity, skill and endurance. Public managers who master this craft can add great value.

What are the coping strategies which government agencies can use to manage risks rather than be overwhelmed by them? How can we become better at managing risks?

Mr van Beusekom will share his experiences and introduce frameworks to help make this happen.

Moderator and Second Speaker: Julie Read, CE and Director of the Serious Fraud Office
ends

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