Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Tree felling case highlights need for care

Tree felling case highlights need for care

‘Check before you chop’ – this is the advice from the New Zealand Arboricultural Association (NZ Arb) in response to a recent publicised tree felling.

The Kapiti Coast District Council’s decision to prosecute an Otaki couple for felling indigenous bush on their property is a reminder that local councils may, in specific circumstances, protect individual trees and areas of significant or vulnerable bush on private property, despite recent reforms to the Resource Management Act.

Chris Walsh, NZ Arb President, advises any property owner wishing to fell trees or modify bush to engage with their local council planners beforehand, so they can ascertain whether any restrictions apply. 

“Arboriculture is a largely unregulated industry in New Zealand, however many local councils have their own tree rules,” says Walsh.  “Given this, it’s important to check the situation in a particular area before undertaking tree work and get advice from a reputable arborist, such as a member of NZ Arb.”

As the industry’s professional body, NZ Arb members are required to adhere to a clear code of conduct and appropriate professional standards, and would be expected to be familiar with any local tree felling restrictions.  Property owners can contact NZ Arb via www.nzarb.org.nz to be informed which contractors in their local area are Association members.  The organisation also runs an ‘Approved Contractor Scheme’ – these contractors have undergone a rigorous vetting process and need to maintain the highest professional and ethical standards to retain their status. 

“By engaging one of our members or an Approved Contractor, property owners can expect to receive accurate advice on both the local regulations and appropriate tree care,” says Walsh.

NZ Arb does not have the full detail of the Otaki case, which is still before courts; however it notes the trees in question were within a regionally significant ecological site and an 'acutely threatened' landscape that has been identified and mapped by the Council.  The organisation also understands in areas such as the Manawatu Plains, where only 4% of the land retains its indigenous vegetation cover, local authorities will usually take steps to protect the remainder. 

Walsh adds: “As this case highlights, seeking appropriate regulatory and professional advice before taking action can prevent these unfortunate situations arising.”

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell: On Journalism’s Future In The Era Of “Alternative Facts.”

Already, the White House has made it clear that the media are the new enemy that the new President’s supporters will be encouraged to unite against. (What else can they do now they don’t have Hillary Clinton to demonise any more?)

The fantastic phrase “alternative facts” coined by Trump spinmeister Kellyanne Conway captures the media strategy in a nutshell. More>>

 

PM's Press Conference: TPP, Trade And Minimum Wage

Prime Minister Bill English’s first official press conference of the year began with a warm welcome back from holidays. In relation to President Trump’s withdrawal from the TPP he expressed disappointment but hopes to negotiate a bilateral agreement with the US in the future. More>>

Employment: Minimum Wage To Increase To $15.75

The minimum wage will increase by 50 cents to $15.75 an hour on 1 April 2017... The starting-out and training hourly minimum wage rates will increase from $12.20 to $12.60 per hour, remaining at 80 per cent of the adult minimum wage.More>>

ALSO:

Housing: Sit-In Occupation To Stop Niki’s Eviction

The Tāmaki Redevelopment Company hopes to issue a Possession Order for 14 Taniwha Street, Glen Innes. This will give them the ability to forcibly evict Ioela ‘Niki’ Rauti who has lived at 14 Taniwha Street for 21 years... More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Bill English, Abroad

If David Cameron was the closest thing John Key had to a political mentor, their successors also share a whole lot in common. Theresa May and Bill English were both propelled into the top jobs as the result of unexpected resignations, and without much in the way of credible competition from their colleagues... More>>

ALSO:

Pike River: Labour Bill To Override Safety Act For Mine Entry

“Bill English has been hiding behind the legal excuse that any attempt to re-enter the mine to recover the bodies might place the mine’s owner, Solid Energy Limited, and its directors in breach of the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015." More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Populism And Labour 2017

For many people on the centre-left, populism is a dirty word, and a shorthand for the politics of bigotry. In this country, it has tended to be equated with the angry legions of New Zealand First. Who knew they were not just a reactionary spasm, but the wave of the future? More>>

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news