Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


MTG Hawke’s Bay soon to open new suite of exhibitions

MTG Hawke’s Bay soon to open new suite of exhibitions


Image credit: Bronwynne Cornish, Standing Figures (detail). Image: David Frost, MTG Hawke’s Bay.

A major exhibition of one of New Zealand’s foremost ceramic artists will open at MTG Hawke’s Bay next month.
Mudlark, a celebration of the life and work of ceramic sculptor Bronwynne Cornish, will see the museum’s upper floor be taken over by sphinxes, temples, cats and birds as it hosts the largest survey of Cornish’s work ever shown in New Zealand.

The exhibition, which runs between 29 March and 24 August, heralds the first major change of shows for MTG Hawke’s Bay since its opening in 21 September 2013. It replaces the popular show Architecture of the heart in the upper floor galleries.

MTG Director Douglas Lloyd Jenkins says Bronwynne Cornish has strong ties to Hawke’s Bay, having being raised here as a child so it is fitting this major exhibition opens in her former stomping ground.

“We are very fortunate to have worked with Bronwynne to develop this exhibition and celebrate her important position in the development of contemporary New Zealand art, in particular a life devoted to clay,” Mr Lloyd Jenkins, says.

“The show is hugely impressive and I’m very proud of it. It confirms MTG’s growing reputation as a museum and gallery of excellence. We’ve already been approached by other galleries in New Zealand who have shown interest in this MTG curated show, which is a testament to the calibre of our curators.”

Cornish first discovered clay in the 1960s and has worked with it ever since. Her distinctive figurative works carry a strong sense of both their material and maker; pushing boundaries and perceptions of both contemporary craft and sculpture.

The exhibition brings together the most significant group of her earthenware figures ever to be assembled. From their various homes around the country, baa birds, sphinxes, temples and cats come together to showcase Cornish’s impressive body of work. It covers work from the period 1982 – 2013.

The exhibition is accompanied by a publication written by MTG Curator of Design Collections Lucy Hammonds, with contributions from Alexa Johnson and Denis O’Connor. It includes a major photographic essay by photographers Deborah Smith and Mark Smith, which chronicles the ‘secret lives’ of Cornish’s works within the homes of key collectors.

In conjunction with Mudlark two smaller exhibitions will occupy the upper floor of MTG at the same time - The Transmogrifier Machine where contemporary furniture designer Katy Wallace turns ordinary old furniture into modified extraordinary pieces, and Land Marks two large scale sculptures from the Hawke’s Bay Museums Trust collection.

During the significant change over of exhibitions between 2 -28 March, the upper floor galleries will be unavailable for viewing. Reduced entry charge of $5.00 will be available during this time, but visitors will be able to enjoy the range of other exhibitions including the 1931 Hawke’s Bay Earthquake, Take these with you when you leave – Treasures of the archive and Ukaipo – o tatou whakapapa.
ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Plain Packs Plan: Gordon Campbell On Tobacco Politicking (And The TPP Death Watch)

Has Act leader David Seymour got the easiest job in the world, or what? Roll out of bed, turn on the radio and hmm…there do seem to be a lot of problems out there in the world. Must think of something. And so it came to pass that this morning, David Seymour took up his sword and shield to fight for a world that’s about to be denied the rich and vibrant beauty of tobacco advertising. More>>

ALSO:

.


RECENT TPP MEETING:

Professor Ian Shirley: The Budget That Failed Auckland

The 2016 budget offered Auckland nothing in the way of vision or hope and it continued the National Government’s threats against the Auckland Council. Threatening the Council with over-riding its democratic processes if it fails to release land for housing is a bullying tactic aimed at diverting attention away from the fundamental problems with housing in the region. More>>

ALSO:

PM's Post Cab Presser: Budgets, Trusts And Pacific Diplomacy

Today Prime Minister John Key summarised last week’s budget and provided further detail about his upcoming trip to Fiji. He said that there has been “plenty going on” in the last couple of weeks and emphasised the need for Auckland council to facilitate more housing supply. More>>

ALSO:

Max Rashbrooke: A Failure Of Measurement: Inside The Budget Lock-Up

Shortly after the embargo lifted at 2pm news organisations started filing reports claiming that health, and to a lesser extent housing and education, were the ‘big winners’ out of the Budget. It failed to take into account the fact that in most cases the apparent increases were in fact cuts. Because of the twin effects of inflation and population. More>>

ALSO:

DOCtored Figures: Minister Clarifies DOC Budget

“Commentators have overlooked the fact $20.7m of that perceived shortfall is new funding for Battle for our Birds 2016, provided for in last week’s Budget...” DOC also has approval in principle to carry over a further $20m to 16/17 due to unexpected delays in a number of projects. More>>

ALSO:

For The Birds: Gordon Campbell On The Budget

Budgies, so their Wikipedia page says, are popular pets around the world due to their small size, low cost, and ability to mimic human speech. Which is a reasonably good description of Finance Minister Bill English eighth Budget. . More>>

Max Rashbrooke On The 2016 Budget

The best label for this year’s announcement by Bill English might be the ‘Bare Minimum Budget’. It does the bare minimum to defuse potential political damage in a range of areas – homelessness and health are prime among them – but almost nothing to address the country’s most deep-rooted, systemic social problems. Indeed the Budget hints that these problems may get worse. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Bank Scandals (And Air Crashes)

Last month, the Australian Securities and Investment Commission (ASIC) filed proceedings against Westpac over activities that have some distinct echoes of the Libor scandal. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news