Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search


MTG Hawke’s Bay soon to open new suite of exhibitions

MTG Hawke’s Bay soon to open new suite of exhibitions

Image credit: Bronwynne Cornish, Standing Figures (detail). Image: David Frost, MTG Hawke’s Bay.

A major exhibition of one of New Zealand’s foremost ceramic artists will open at MTG Hawke’s Bay next month.
Mudlark, a celebration of the life and work of ceramic sculptor Bronwynne Cornish, will see the museum’s upper floor be taken over by sphinxes, temples, cats and birds as it hosts the largest survey of Cornish’s work ever shown in New Zealand.

The exhibition, which runs between 29 March and 24 August, heralds the first major change of shows for MTG Hawke’s Bay since its opening in 21 September 2013. It replaces the popular show Architecture of the heart in the upper floor galleries.

MTG Director Douglas Lloyd Jenkins says Bronwynne Cornish has strong ties to Hawke’s Bay, having being raised here as a child so it is fitting this major exhibition opens in her former stomping ground.

“We are very fortunate to have worked with Bronwynne to develop this exhibition and celebrate her important position in the development of contemporary New Zealand art, in particular a life devoted to clay,” Mr Lloyd Jenkins, says.

“The show is hugely impressive and I’m very proud of it. It confirms MTG’s growing reputation as a museum and gallery of excellence. We’ve already been approached by other galleries in New Zealand who have shown interest in this MTG curated show, which is a testament to the calibre of our curators.”

Cornish first discovered clay in the 1960s and has worked with it ever since. Her distinctive figurative works carry a strong sense of both their material and maker; pushing boundaries and perceptions of both contemporary craft and sculpture.

The exhibition brings together the most significant group of her earthenware figures ever to be assembled. From their various homes around the country, baa birds, sphinxes, temples and cats come together to showcase Cornish’s impressive body of work. It covers work from the period 1982 – 2013.

The exhibition is accompanied by a publication written by MTG Curator of Design Collections Lucy Hammonds, with contributions from Alexa Johnson and Denis O’Connor. It includes a major photographic essay by photographers Deborah Smith and Mark Smith, which chronicles the ‘secret lives’ of Cornish’s works within the homes of key collectors.

In conjunction with Mudlark two smaller exhibitions will occupy the upper floor of MTG at the same time - The Transmogrifier Machine where contemporary furniture designer Katy Wallace turns ordinary old furniture into modified extraordinary pieces, and Land Marks two large scale sculptures from the Hawke’s Bay Museums Trust collection.

During the significant change over of exhibitions between 2 -28 March, the upper floor galleries will be unavailable for viewing. Reduced entry charge of $5.00 will be available during this time, but visitors will be able to enjoy the range of other exhibitions including the 1931 Hawke’s Bay Earthquake, Take these with you when you leave – Treasures of the archive and Ukaipo – o tatou whakapapa.

© Scoop Media

Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines



Gordon Campbell: On John Key’s Trip To Iraq

In the embedded press coverage on this trip, the absence so far of any evaluation of the wider context of what New Zealand thinks it is doing at Camp Taji has been striking. More>>


Labour: Parata Puts Brakes On Charter School Appraisal

“When the Ministry of Education recommended they compare the achievements of children at charter schools to those of their counterparts at state schools, the documents show Hekia Parata specifically prohibited them from doing so." More>>


Bad Day For Universities: Gun, Bomb Threats On Three Campuses

Dunedin Police are continuing their investigation into the threat made against the University of Otago. Staff are following a number of lines of inquiry, and police are working to verify the authenticity and source of the post. More>>


Gordon Campbell: On The TPP Deal Reached In Atlanta

Yes, the TPP has helped to knock a few points off the tariffs facing our exporters. Yet some of those alleged dollar gains may well have been made regardless over time – and without the negative baggage of the concessions in the non-trade areas (intellectual property, copyright extensions, investor-state dispute mechanisms etc) that the TPP deal also brings in its wake. More>> (Cartoon by Dave Wolland)

Public Summaries:


Wellington.Scoop: Serco – First The Prisons, And Now It Wants To Run The Trains

As the government continues its inquiry into Serco’s discredited administration of Mt Eden prison in Auckland, here in Wellington there’s further scrutiny of the British outsourcing company – because it’s competing to take over the running of our commuter trains. More>>


Pre-Signing: Gordon Campbell On The TPP Countdown

To date, the Key government has been unwilling to share any information about this TPP deal until it is too late for outraged public opinion to affect the outcome... the disclosure process is likely to consist of a similarly skewed and careful exercise in spin. More>>


Australia Deportations: English Relaxed On Immigration Centre Conditions

Labour's Annette King: “There have been numerous reports from inside these detention centres on just how bad conditions are... If they were being held in any other foreign jail, I imagine Mr English would be somewhat concerned. More>>


Schools: Achievement-Based Funding Would Be A Disaster

The Education Minister’s speech to the PPTA Conference raising the spectre of achievement data driving a new funding system would be disastrous, says NZEI Te Riu Roa. More>>

  • Video Out-Link - PPTA Annual Conference 2015 on Livestream (Q+A dicussion suggests funding would be directed to less successful schools.)

  • ALSO:

    ECE Report:

    Get More From Scoop



    Search Scoop  
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news