Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Tauranga Hospital Celebrates Centenary

Tauranga Hospital Celebrates Centenary


Tauranga Hospital is 100 years old today. BOPDHB Chief Executive Officer Phil Cammish said the historic event was an opportunity to reflect on 100 years of innovation and excellence and look forward to an even brighter future.

When the Inspector-General of Hospitals Dr T.H.A. Valintine officially opened Tauranga Hospital on 6 March 1914 it had a live-in staff of four, a cow for milk supply, and a horse for staff transport.

The 250m² E-shaped building included two wards (a four-bed male ward and two-bed female ward) and sat in an acre of grounds. Today the hospital buildings total 58,000m² of floor space and sit on a 12 hectare campus. There are 349 beds and a 2240-strong staff is employed from the Tauranga site.

Much of the hospital’s expansion has occurred since the 1950s, up to which point it was still considered a cottage hospital.

“Today we have a modern hospital that can no longer be considered a cottage hospital,” said Mr Cammish. “We also have a wonderfully dedicated staff practising innovative and sometimes world-leading medicine for the people of the Bay of Plenty.

“I am often told by people how proud they are of Tauranga Hospital, and especially so when they drive past and compare today’s modern buildings to the 1950’s cottage hospital.”

Many wonderful stories have come forward from former staff members and patients in the lead-up to the centenary. A number of these are included on storyboards which will hang in the hospital’s main corridor over the coming weeks. They also form the basis of a commemorative booklet being produced to celebrate the event.

“Reflecting on the last 100 years has presented a timely opportunity for us to reconnect with the past, and discover stories about people who have worked at the hospital during that time,” said Mr Cammish.

Minister of Health Tony Ryall will visit the hospital tomorrow (Friday) and unveil a plaque in the Roof Garden commemorating the centenary. Mr Ryall will also take the opportunity to tour the hospital, including its Stroke Unit.

“If we need an example of advances in clinical care, this has to be a great one,” added Mr Cammish. “Not too many years ago a stroke usually condemned you to a life of perpetual disability but with today’s advances in medication and clinical rehabilitation, many stroke patients have a much lessened degree of disability and in many cases continue with a life which is close to normal.”

Centennial Facts – Did You Know?

Tauranga Hospital first opened on 6 March 1914, and throughout its early years even maintained a small farm.

“…(it is recommended) that a water trough be provided in the middle paddock near the nurses’ home; that the two pigs be sent to the bacon factory and that two others be purchased.” Tauranga Hospital Board Visiting Committee, November 1927.

In 1915 it was agreed an isolation ward was required and a concert, given by the Commercial Travellers Association, was held to raise money for the build which was to cost 594 pounds (today $78,797).
At that time, the average occupied beds in Tauranga Hospital numbered 3.3, today it is 307. There was a live-in staff of four (today 2240 who do not live in) and the average duration of stay of patients was 17 days (today it is 4 days).
The total annual cost of running the hospital was £1132 ($17,511). In 2014 it is $250 million. The average cost of treating patients was eight shillings and three pence per day ($57). Today it is $4600.

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

2014 General Election: Voting Period Begins

The first votes for the 2014 general election will be cast today, Wednesday 3 September, as advance voting begins ahead of election day on Saturday 20 September.

“Election day is September 20, but if you want, you can vote from today,” says Chief Electoral Officer Robert Peden. “Almost 300 advance voting places will be available around the country for people to cast early votes.”

Times and opening hours will vary around the country to suit local needs. More>>

 
 

Parliament Today:

Two Dead, One Injured: Suspect Charged After Ashburton Shooting

Russell John Tully has appeared in Christchurch District Court. Tully has been remanded in custody on charges of murder of Peg Noble and Leigh Cleveland and attempted murder of Lindy Curtis. More>>

ALSO:

John Key Press Conference: Ashburton Shootings, Judith Collins Inquiry

Prime Minister John Key has delayed the release of Nationals’ fiscal policy in light of this morning’s shooting at a Work and Income office in Ashburton... Key also answered questions about Judith Collins, and confirmed that independent inquiry will be held with regard to allegations made against Collins. More>>

ALSO:

Internet MANA: Georgina Beyer Rocks The Waka

“There is now, and always will be, a range of views about many issues within our movement and members are free to express them, but Georgina’s views on Kim Dotcom are not shared by the MANA Movement leadership or the vast majority of MANA members and supporters around the country” states MANA Candidate for Waiariki, Annette Sykes. More>>

ALSO:

IGIS Update: Inquiry Into Release Of NZSIS Information

The Inquiry would be conducted in private and individuals would appear before her separately over a period of more than a week. She does not intend to name those summoned to give evidence until her report is published. “I can confirm that all persons summoned will be required to appear under oath...” More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell:
On John Key’s ‘Blame It On Judith’ Strategy

Right now, Prime Minister John Key seems intent on limiting the scope of any inquiry into his government’s dealings with Cameron Slater. The declared aim is to make that inquiry solely about Judith Collins’ behavior with respect to the Serious Fraud Office. More>>

ALSO:

Maori Council Lawyers' Statement: Supreme Court Decision On Maori Water Rights

“…the Supreme Court refused to give Pouakani people what they asked for, but may have given them something much, much better instead… the Supreme Court has questioned whether the Crown owns the River at all.” More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Debate, And The Collins Accusation

Debating is a peculiar discipline in that what you say is less important than how you’re saying it. Looking poised, being articulate and staying on topic generally wins the day – and on that score, Labour leader David Cunliffe won what turned out to be a bruising encounter with Prime Minister John Key last night on TVNZ. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news