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Waiariki names its first associate professors

Waiariki names its first associate professors

Waiariki Institute of Technology has two associate professors – the first time this title has been bestowed on staff at the Rotorua-based institute.

Dr Craig Morley and Dr Clarke Raymond were awarded their new titles in recognition of their significant contribution to research, learning and teaching and their regional, national and international standings.

The associate professorships were awarded through Waiariki’s inaugural contestable appointments process, which involved external referee reviews and panel interviews.

Dr Morley, a lecturer in resource management at Waiariki, is an expert in environmental sustainability and conservation who has previously lectured at University of the South Pacific and worked at the Department of Conservation. He has more than 25 years’ experience in resource management, conservation and sustainability.

Dr Raymond, who is an experienced research scientist and heads Waiariki’s Centre for Business, Research and Enterprise, has been at the institute since 2012 when he was appointed head of research. He has previously worked at Australia National University in Canberra and is a former Rotorua Boys’ High School head boy with a PhD and BSc (with honours) in neuroscience from the University of Otago.

Waiariki Chief Executive Professor Margaret Noble says the associate professorships demonstrate the growing culture of high quality research and learning that has developed at Waiariki.

“While this is a community-based institute of technology with certificate and diploma level programmes, Waiariki also provides higher vocational qualifications at degree, graduate and postgraduate levels and the New Zealand Qualifications Authority requires these be underpinned by research,” Professor Noble says.

“To have two of our staff achieving the standard of associate professor is wonderful and a great step forward for Waiariki. It’s great for Waiariki to have staff of this capability, who have worked internationally.” “Right now it is an important time to reflect on this continued improvement but we also won’t rest here as it is part of our new strategic plan to continue to lift success rates and contribution to our region and communities.”

While Waiariki continues to improve in the government priority areas of Māori and youth success it has also grown its export education contribution to New Zealand by 303% since 2008. There were 850 international students in 2012, up 200 on 2011 totals, and now more than 600 above the 2008 figure.

“International education continues to be an important business driver for our country and institute while it also allows the rich cultural exchange which enhances our distinctly bicultural focus for the benefit of all of our students and the region,” says Professor Noble.

—ENDS—

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