Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


First post-tensioned timber building opens in Christchurch

First post-tensioned timber building opens in Christchurch

March 10, 2014

The first multi-storey post-earthquake timber building using low-damage post-tensioned timber technology has opened in Christchurch.

The wooden superstructure building in Victoria Street, owned by Tony Merritt, is the first quake-resilient open-plan timber office building in the city rebuild.

The building’s post-tensioned design and technology is the brainchild of the University of Canterbury (UC) civil engineering professors Andy Buchanan and Stefano Pampanin with support from senior lecturer Dr Alessandro Palermo.

Their research began before the 2010 and 2011 earthquakes and it resulted in pre-fabricated and glue-laminated box beams and solid columns, used in the design of this building by architect Jasper van der Lingen of Sheppard and Rout and structural engineer Jade Kirk of Kirk Roberts.

The timber is threaded with high-tensile steel tendons and shock-absorbing steel componentry that enable the building to essentially spring back into alignment after a major quake.

Another large post-quake building, for Trimble Navigation, officially opens in Christchurch on April 4.

``The Trimble building uses the same post-tensioned timber technology as the Merritt building. It is only two storeys but it covers a much larger area. The Trimble building is a hi-tech building with all the latest Trimble technology for monitoring building performance.

``Another similar technology structure is being built in Kaikoura for the Kaikoura District Council which will contain a museum, library and council offices. It is a three storey building, built entirely of wood above the concrete foundations. It uses post-tensioned rocking timber walls for low-damage earthquake resistance.

``On the corner of Montreal Street and Hereford Street by the Christchurch City Council offices, the 1930 St Elmo Courts, which were demolished after the earthquakes, has been replaced by a

a six-storey office building using an optimum combination of materials.

The three UC engineers at the cutting edge of safe building design in the post-quake era have been recognised for their efforts in playing a significant part in the rebuild of Christchurch.

Last year they were awarded UC’s Innovation Medal for using their academic knowledge to benefit the wider community. The trio were chosen following their innovative contribution to the new system of earthquake-resistant buildings using post-tensioned structural timber.

College of Engineering Pro-Vice-Chancellor Professor Jan Evans-Freeman says the trio spent many years’ work, along with creative and innovative thinking, to produce state of the art safe building technology.

``Their contribution includes research, development, promotion and technical support. Their pioneering UC research has lifted engineered timber buildings into serious contention for the Christchurch rebuild after the 2010 and 2011 earthquakes.’’

The work of the leading UC engineers has resulted in the use of timber as a structural material and new buildings of up to 10 storeys are being built in Europe, North America and Australia, with proposals for a 30-storey timber building on the drawing board in Canada, Professor Evans-Freeman says.

The UC engineering research resulting in structural support for Christchurch and New Zealand shows that UC is a leader in the development of timber buildings.

Engineering has always been UC’s trump card but the university recently jumped to 19th in the world in civil and structural engineering according to the latest QS world university rankings by subject. Civil engineering at UC is ranked third in the southern hemisphere.


Ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Human Rights Commission: Urgent Need For Action On Seclusion And Restraint

A new independent report has outlined a number of serious concerns about New Zealand’s seclusion and restraint practices, says the Human Rights Commission...

Chief Human Rights Commissioner David Rutherford says that while the report makes for sobering reading, the focus should now be on how the recommendations can be used to reduce the occurrence of seclusion and restraint in New Zealand and, in circumstances where it is necessary, to improve practices. More>>

 

$11bn Capital Spend, New Debt Target: Steven Joyce On Budget Priorities

First, delivering better public services for a growing country – providing all New Zealanders with the opportunity to lead successful independent lives... And finally, we remain committed to reducing the tax burden and in particular the impact of marginal tax rates on lower and middle income earners, when we have the room to do so. More>>

ALSO:

JustSpeak Report: Bail Changes To Blame For New Billion Dollar Prison

In 2013 criminal justice spending was falling and the Government was mulling over what to spend the money on. 3 years later there are 10,000 people in prison and a new billion dollar prison is announced. More>>

ALSO:

Asylum: Dunne Accepts Hundreds Of Postcards On Refugee Categories

Minister Peter Dunne today accepted over 800 postcards calling for convention refugees to have the same entitlements as quota refugees... The campaign has been run with ActionStation together with LUSH Cosmetics, with postcards being signed in stores around New Zealand. More>>

ALSO:

Reshuffle: PM Announces Changes To Ministerial Portfolios

Prime Minister Bill English today announced the appointment of Gerry Brownlee as Minister of Foreign Affairs, Nathan Guy as Minister of Civil Defence, Nikki Kaye as Minister of Education and Mark Mitchell as Minister of Defence. More>>

ALSO:

Q+A Transcript: CTU Call For 'National Standards' On Wages

‘If you look at countries who do better than us, who pay wages better, who have more competitive industries, more successful economies, they have systems where there are national standards.’ More>>

ALSO:

Energy: Greens Launch Plan For Cheaper And Cleaner Electricity

$112 million for winter warm-up payments to help low-income households cover their power bills • setting a goal for 100 percent renewable electricity by 2030 (in average hydrological conditions) • an investigation into the electricity wholesale market. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news