Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Giant willow aphid found in Hawke’s Bay

Giant willow aphid found in Hawke’s Bay


Hawke’s Bay Regional Council is monitoring the spread of the Giant willow aphid after the insects were recently discovered on willows by most of our rivers.

“We are starting to find the Giant Willow Aphid, and getting reports of it being in a few locations so this bug is definitely in Hawke’s Bay. So far, it seems that not a lot is known about the insect, or just how badly it could affect the willows long term,” says Mike Adye, HBRC’s Group Manager Asset Management.

This aphid was first detected in New Zealand in December last year. Since its discovery the insect has been reported from Northland, Auckland, Bay of Plenty, Taranaki, Gisborne, Hawke’s Bay, Wairarapa and Tasman District.

Plant & Food Research and the Ministry of Primary Industries provided information to HBRC on the aphid, and HBRC Works Group staff went looking for signs of the insect along the rivers. HBRC is also getting more reports from members of the public.

Mr Adye says that the damage is currently only on a few individual trees but the insect has been found at most Hawke’s Bay rivers.

“This could potentially be another threat to our willow edge protection zones, so we will be taking a very keen interest in any new information released and particularly any control methods that may be available.”

From 2005 HBRC battled Willow sawfly, an insect which defoliated many of the willows used for flood protection alongside stretches of Hawke’s Bay rivers. HBRC spent $9M on remedial action to keep the flood protection up to a high level. New tree species were planted to withstand further sawfly infestations and to help protect the stopbanks. Trees planted to replace willows devastated by willow sawfly are now well established and the river protection is back to where it was before the pest devastated the willows.

Background information attached but in summary:

Tuberolachnus salignus (Giant willow aphid) is a very large aphid with a body length of 5.0-5.8 mm. Wingless individuals (Apterae) are mid-brown to dark brown with several rows of black sclerotic patches. The early season colonies appear in summer and are situated at the base of the willow trees, moving up the stems with increasing numbers. In summer, colonies formed by individuals dispersing from other infestations start higher on the stem, some up to 3.5 m from the ground. By late summer colonies can contain tens of thousands of individuals. Colonies persist through the autumn and although they decline in late autumn, they continue to feed on the stems after leaf fall and into winter.


Hawke’s Bay Regional Council is monitoring the spread of the Giant willow aphid after the insects were recently discovered on willows by most of our rivers.

“We are starting to find the Giant Willow Aphid, and getting reports of it being in a few locations so this bug is definitely in Hawke’s Bay. So far, it seems that not a lot is known about the insect, or just how badly it could affect the willows long term,” says Mike Adye, HBRC’s Group Manager Asset Management.

This aphid was first detected in New Zealand in December last year. Since its discovery the insect has been reported from Northland, Auckland, Bay of Plenty, Taranaki, Gisborne, Hawke’s Bay, Wairarapa and Tasman District.

Plant & Food Research and the Ministry of Primary Industries provided information to HBRC on the aphid, and HBRC Works Group staff went looking for signs of the insect along the rivers. HBRC is also getting more reports from members of the public.

Mr Adye says that the damage is currently only on a few individual trees but the insect has been found at most Hawke’s Bay rivers.

“This could potentially be another threat to our willow edge protection zones, so we will be taking a very keen interest in any new information released and particularly any control methods that may be available.”

From 2005 HBRC battled Willow sawfly, an insect which defoliated many of the willows used for flood protection alongside stretches of Hawke’s Bay rivers. HBRC spent $9M on remedial action to keep the flood protection up to a high level. New tree species were planted to withstand further sawfly infestations and to help protect the stopbanks. Trees planted to replace willows devastated by willow sawfly are now well established and the river protection is back to where it was before the pest devastated the willows.


Tuberolachnus salignus (Giant willow aphid) is a very large aphid with a body length of 5.0-5.8 mm. Wingless individuals (Apterae) are mid-brown to dark brown with several rows of black sclerotic patches. The early season colonies appear in summer and are situated at the base of the willow trees, moving up the stems with increasing numbers. In summer, colonies formed by individuals dispersing from other infestations start higher on the stem, some up to 3.5 m from the ground. By late summer colonies can contain tens of thousands of individuals. Colonies persist through the autumn and although they decline in late autumn, they continue to feed on the stems after leaf fall and into winter.
ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

PARLIAMENT TODAY:

Flyover Over: NZTA Not Appealing Flyover Decision

The NZ Transport Agency has decided not to appeal the High Court’s Basin Bridge decision, and says the High Court’s findings provide valuable clarity to help guide the development of future infrastructure projects throughout the country. More>>

ALSO:

Developing Crown Land: Government, Auckland Iwi Reach Agreement

The government has reached agreement with Ngati Whatua and other Auckland iwi over developing 500 hectares of excess land in Auckland for private housing which had been under High Court challenge. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Maurice Williamson

Maurice Williamson seems to have been granted an annual licence to embarrass the National Party, and its that time of year again. Also as per usual, Williamson’s recent exercise in sexism and homophobia has passed by with barely a murmur from his leader. More>>

ALSO:

Green Climate Plan: Shaw Launches 40% Emission Cut Target

Green Party co-leader James Shaw has announced an emissions target initiative for 40% reduction by 2030. He said agriculture has to long been used as a reason for inaction, a roadblock to action... He proposed a tax of 8 cents per kilo of milk. More>>

ALSO:


Images & Video: Four Alternative Flags For Referendum

Flag Consideration Panel chair, Professor John Burrows, said the Panel’s decision had been guided first and foremost by the results of its engagement programme across a range of communities where thousands of Kiwis shared what was special about New Zealand, as well as the Panel’s own selection criteria. More>>

ALSO:

Transport Report: LGNZ Calls For Proactive Approach To Mobilise Regions

LGNZ has today released Mobilising the Regions, its major transport study, which highlights the economic and social impact of strategic transport decisions nationally and in the regions, and the direct link between regional development, national prosperity, social well-being and cohesiveness. More>>

ALSO:

Transport: New Rules Bring Double-Deckers To Our Cities

New rules that allow buses, including double-deckers, to carry more people will ramp up the public transport offering in our cities, Transport Minister Simon Bridges and Associate Transport Minister Craig Foss say. More>>

ALSO:

Cycling:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news