Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Giant willow aphid found in Hawke’s Bay

Giant willow aphid found in Hawke’s Bay


Hawke’s Bay Regional Council is monitoring the spread of the Giant willow aphid after the insects were recently discovered on willows by most of our rivers.

“We are starting to find the Giant Willow Aphid, and getting reports of it being in a few locations so this bug is definitely in Hawke’s Bay. So far, it seems that not a lot is known about the insect, or just how badly it could affect the willows long term,” says Mike Adye, HBRC’s Group Manager Asset Management.

This aphid was first detected in New Zealand in December last year. Since its discovery the insect has been reported from Northland, Auckland, Bay of Plenty, Taranaki, Gisborne, Hawke’s Bay, Wairarapa and Tasman District.

Plant & Food Research and the Ministry of Primary Industries provided information to HBRC on the aphid, and HBRC Works Group staff went looking for signs of the insect along the rivers. HBRC is also getting more reports from members of the public.

Mr Adye says that the damage is currently only on a few individual trees but the insect has been found at most Hawke’s Bay rivers.

“This could potentially be another threat to our willow edge protection zones, so we will be taking a very keen interest in any new information released and particularly any control methods that may be available.”

From 2005 HBRC battled Willow sawfly, an insect which defoliated many of the willows used for flood protection alongside stretches of Hawke’s Bay rivers. HBRC spent $9M on remedial action to keep the flood protection up to a high level. New tree species were planted to withstand further sawfly infestations and to help protect the stopbanks. Trees planted to replace willows devastated by willow sawfly are now well established and the river protection is back to where it was before the pest devastated the willows.

Background information attached but in summary:

Tuberolachnus salignus (Giant willow aphid) is a very large aphid with a body length of 5.0-5.8 mm. Wingless individuals (Apterae) are mid-brown to dark brown with several rows of black sclerotic patches. The early season colonies appear in summer and are situated at the base of the willow trees, moving up the stems with increasing numbers. In summer, colonies formed by individuals dispersing from other infestations start higher on the stem, some up to 3.5 m from the ground. By late summer colonies can contain tens of thousands of individuals. Colonies persist through the autumn and although they decline in late autumn, they continue to feed on the stems after leaf fall and into winter.


Hawke’s Bay Regional Council is monitoring the spread of the Giant willow aphid after the insects were recently discovered on willows by most of our rivers.

“We are starting to find the Giant Willow Aphid, and getting reports of it being in a few locations so this bug is definitely in Hawke’s Bay. So far, it seems that not a lot is known about the insect, or just how badly it could affect the willows long term,” says Mike Adye, HBRC’s Group Manager Asset Management.

This aphid was first detected in New Zealand in December last year. Since its discovery the insect has been reported from Northland, Auckland, Bay of Plenty, Taranaki, Gisborne, Hawke’s Bay, Wairarapa and Tasman District.

Plant & Food Research and the Ministry of Primary Industries provided information to HBRC on the aphid, and HBRC Works Group staff went looking for signs of the insect along the rivers. HBRC is also getting more reports from members of the public.

Mr Adye says that the damage is currently only on a few individual trees but the insect has been found at most Hawke’s Bay rivers.

“This could potentially be another threat to our willow edge protection zones, so we will be taking a very keen interest in any new information released and particularly any control methods that may be available.”

From 2005 HBRC battled Willow sawfly, an insect which defoliated many of the willows used for flood protection alongside stretches of Hawke’s Bay rivers. HBRC spent $9M on remedial action to keep the flood protection up to a high level. New tree species were planted to withstand further sawfly infestations and to help protect the stopbanks. Trees planted to replace willows devastated by willow sawfly are now well established and the river protection is back to where it was before the pest devastated the willows.


Tuberolachnus salignus (Giant willow aphid) is a very large aphid with a body length of 5.0-5.8 mm. Wingless individuals (Apterae) are mid-brown to dark brown with several rows of black sclerotic patches. The early season colonies appear in summer and are situated at the base of the willow trees, moving up the stems with increasing numbers. In summer, colonies formed by individuals dispersing from other infestations start higher on the stem, some up to 3.5 m from the ground. By late summer colonies can contain tens of thousands of individuals. Colonies persist through the autumn and although they decline in late autumn, they continue to feed on the stems after leaf fall and into winter.
ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Vaccine Funding Change: HPV Vaccines For All Children

PHARMAC has today announced changes to funded vaccines, which will benefit an extra 100,000 people... The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine will be available for all children and adults up to the age of 26 years, and boys will now be included in the HPV school vaccination programme. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Why The Opinion Polls For Key And Trump Defy Gravity

What is going on? Donald Trump got confirmed as the Republican presidential candidate at a bizarrely chaotic political convention… and promptly received an upwards bump in the polls to where he’s now rating ahead of Hillary Clinton, for only the second time this year. More>>

Sugar: Auckland Leisure Centres Axe Unhealthy Drinks

Auckland Council is to stop selling drinks that are sweetened by sugar from vending machines at its leisure centres in a bid to try to reduce obesity and type 2 diabetes... More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Todd McClay’s Faulty Memory

Time and again, whenever an issue arises the initial response by government is to deny or diminish the problem – nothing to worry about here, everything’s OK, move on. Then, hang on. In line with the usual pattern, as embarrassing details emerged into daylight, the story changed. More>>

ALSO:

Labour's 'Future Of Work': Major Reform Of Careers And Apprenticeships

The next Labour Government will transform careers advice in high schools to ensure every student has a personalised career plan, Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little says. More>>

ALSO:

State Investments Management: Treasury Likes IRD, Not Education Or Corrections

The Inland Revenue Department has scored an 'A' in the first tranche of the Treasury's investor confidence rating for state agencies that manage significant Crown investments and assets, gaining greater autonomy as a result, while the Corrections and Education ministries gained a 'C' rating. More>>

ALSO:

Govt Goal: NZ To Be "Predator Free" By 2050

Prime Minister John Key has today announced the Government has adopted the goal of New Zealand becoming Predator Free by 2050... “That’s why we have adopted this goal. Our ambition is that by 2050 every single part of New Zealand will be completely free of rats, stoats and possums." More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news