Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Action Underway to Prevent Wastewater Overflows

Action Underway to Prevent Wastewater Overflows

A three-pronged programme is underway to address the most common causes of wastewater overflows in the Queenstown Lakes District.

Recent overflows have been traced to blockages caused by fat and building material.

QLDC Chief Engineer Ulrich Glasner said most of the people who were causing the problems would not necessarily understand the implications of what they were doing, but the consequences for the environment and the Council’s reputation were serious.

“We have about 400km of pipe, used by 29,000 different residents and 2.7 million visitors every year, on top of the commercial users. We can’t control what they all do, but we can make them aware of the effect their actions have – things don’t just ‘disappear’ when they drop down the drain or into the toilet.”

The overflows resulted in a request by the Council for a full review, Mayor Vanessa van Uden said. “What we now understand is that in addition to individuals making poor choices, the Council was not delivering an acceptable level of preventative maintenance. We have moved to remedy this as a priority.”

The Council has expanded its preventative maintenance programme to clean and inspect nearly 15km of pipes over the next three months. The priority work comprises 10km of pipes in Queenstown, including Frankton and Arthur’s Point; 2.5km in Wanaka and 2.2km in Arrowtown.

The work is already underway, and is in addition to the routine inspections that were already programmed in this year’s infrastructure maintenance programme.

Mr Glasner said the pipes were being waterblasted and then inspected with CCTV cameras. The waterblasting clears obstructions such as congealed fat and small quantities of debris, allowing the CCTV camera to get a clear view of any structural problems such as cracks or tree roots breaking through the pipes.

Separately, a team drawn from council engineers, building and health inspectors is working together to target the most common causes of blocked pipes and pumps, and enlist the help of those whose actions are most closely linked to those causes.

Gravel and debris from construction sites and infill housing has been identified as a common source of foreign material in the sewers, and has been the cause of the most recent overflows. As a result, the Council now has an inspector on site when new connections are made to the wastewater system, to ensure no construction material or fittings are dropped into the pipes.

Contractors clearing blockages in the sewer pipes and pumps often pull out construction debris, disposable nappies, cleansing wipes or plumbing fittings – usually stuck together with congealed cooking fat.

To counter this, an education programme is being developed which will target construction companies, building trades and food outlets. It will include workshops, site visits and checklists.

Mr Glasner said poorly maintained grease traps in commercial kitchens were a particular target.

Information is already being provided to householders, through the Council’s newsletter, displays and by direct mail, to help residents understand the consequences of flushing nappies and other inappropriate items down the toilet.

The third “prong” of the Council’s action plan is enforcement, with a Trade Wastes Bylaw expected to be up for consideration by Councillors before the end of the year.

“We take these matters extremely seriously,” Mayor van Uden said. “The community can be assured that any future spills will come under intense scrutiny. We will want to understand how it has happened and what more we need to do to prevent it.”

Fast facts:

Work now underway includes:

Preventative maintenance
14.7km of pipes prioritised for waterblasting and CCTV inspection
subdivisions and infill housing sites inspected when they’re first connected to the sewerage system

Education
Workshops for builders, plumbers and drainlayers
Site visits and information for construction companies and developers
Workshops and site visits for commercial kitchens including hotels, restaurants and takeaway food outlets, particularly targeting grease traps
Community awareness through Council newsletters, displays, social media and direct contact with residents

Enforcement
Investigating the causes of all overflows to try and identify those responsible
Developing a Trade Wastes Bylaw

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Parliament Today:

Werewolf: The Defence Pretence

Last year, the world began spending more money on weapons again, for the first time since 2011... New Zealand belongs to a region – Asia and Oceania – where military spending rose sharply in 2015, by 5.4 per cent. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Not Crying Foul, Argentina

So a couple of guys found to be criminally liable of environmental pollution in Argentina lodge an application with the Overseas Investment Office… in order to buy some prime New Zealand rural land. Seems that their factory back home had carelessly and/or intentionally discharged toxic waste into the Lujan river. Bummer... More>>

ALSO:

Urban & Rural: $303m To Merge And Modernise New Zealand’s Fire Services

Internal Affairs Minister Peter Dunne today announced funding of $303 million over five years to combine urban and rural fire services into one organisation from mid-2017. More>>

ALSO:

High Trust Regime: What Did The PM Tell His Lawyer About Foreign Trusts?

The Government stopped the IRD from reviewing New Zealand foreign trusts shortly after the Prime Minister’s lawyer wrote to the Revenue Minister claiming John Key had promised him the regime would not be changed. More>>

ALSO:

Road Crime: Wicked Campers Vans Classified As Objectionable

The definition of publication includes any "thing that has printed or impressed upon it, or otherwise shown upon it, 1 or more (or a combination of 1 or more) images, representations, signs, statements, or words", The Classification Office has previously classified such 'things' as billboards, t-shirts, and even a drink can. This is the first time the Classification Office has classified a vehicle. More>>

ALSO:

'When New' Repairs: Landmark EQC Settlement

The Earthquake Commission has cut a deal with 98 Canterbury homeowners that affirms the government entity's responsibility to repair earthquake-damaged property to a 'when new' state, as well as covering repairs for undamaged parts of a property and clarifying its position on cash settlement calculations. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Kiwirail’s Latest Stint In The Dogbox

The denigration of Kiwirail continues. The latest review (based on a 2014 assessment) of the options facing the company have enabled Kiwirail to be hung out to dry once again as a liability and burden on the taxpayer. More>>

ALSO:

Royal Society Report: Good Opportunities To Act Now On Climate Change

There are many actions New Zealand can and should take now to reduce the threat of climate change and transition to a low-carbon economy, a report released today by the Royal Society of New Zealand finds... More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news