Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 

Kauri Dieback Found on the Coromandel

Kauri Dieback Found on the Coromandel

Thames-Coromandel District Council is disappointed that despite everyone's best efforts kauri dieback has now been found on the Coromandel Peninsula.

Test results revealed the presence of Phytophtora taxon Agathis (PTA) or kauri dieback disease in a Department of Conservation block in the Whangapoua Forest, north of Whitianga. The area is not easily accessible to the public and is used predominantly by pig hunters.

"We're extremely disappointed that this has happened as we've been working vigorously with many agencies over the years to ensure this fungal disease didn't reach our district," says Thames-Coromandel District Mayor Glenn Leach.

In the past few years our Council has been working vigorously with the kauri 2000 Trust, Department of Conservation and the Waikato Regional Council to stop people bringing the fungus to the Coromandel (usually on their boots after walking in infected forests in other parts of New Zealand).

"Working with these agencies we'll now be ramping up further education and awareness programmes on how to prevent the spread of kauri dieback," says Mayor Leach. "We also want to reassure anyone visiting our district that they can still come and enjoy our walking tracks and our natural environment. Where the disease has been detected is on a Department of Conservation block that has very limited public access," says the Mayor.

Kauri dieback hasn't been reported or detected in any other areas of the Coromandel.

Special boot cleaning stations have been installed at major entrances to Coromandel forest walks so visitors and walkers could scrub down their boots before tracking any potential dieback microbes or fungus into our forests. A boot cleaning station had also been installed at Hannaford's Wharf, in the Coromandel Harbour, where the Fullers 360 Ferry berths with passengers coming from Auckland.

Conservation Minister Nick Smith visited the affected site today and as a precautionary measure has immediately closed the affected area to reduce the spread of risk. Notice to close the 319ha Whangapoua Forest/Hukarahi Conservation Area was signed under Section 13 (1)(c) of the Conservation Act 1987. It takes effect immediately and was done in consultation with local iwi Ngati Hei, the Mercury Bay Community Board, both our Council and the Regional Council.
Dr Smith says the closure will be reviewed in six weeks, once DoC and MPI staff have done further testing.

Meanwhile Dr Smith says his department will be investing more into the Keep Kauri Standing programme led by Ministry of Primary Industries and DoC. This will include extra funding for
1 - Disinfecting/cleaning stations
2 - Public awareness campaigns
3- Research
4 - Community engagement programmes.

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT KAURI DIEBACK CLICK HERE

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell: On Why Labour Isn’t Responsible For Barnaby Joyce

As a desperate Turnbull government tries to treat the Barnaby Joyce affair as a Pauline Hanson fever dream – blame it on the foreigners! We’re the victims of the dastardly New Zealand Labour Party! – our own government has chosen to further that narrative, and make itself an accomplice.

Evidently, the National government is similarly desperate for anything that might discredit or derail the Ardern juggernaut, even if that means throwing Internal Affairs Minister Peter Dunne under a bus More>>

 

Treaty: Agreement In Principle Signed With Moriori

“The Crown acknowledges Moriori was left virtually landless from 1870, hindering its cultural, social and economic development. The Crown also acknowledges its contribution to the myths that the people of Moriori were racially inferior and became extinct." More>>

ALSO:

Susan Devoy: Call For Inquiry Into State Abuse Reaches UN

Race Relations Commissioner Dame Susan Devoy is in Geneva and has asked a United Nations committee to urge the New Zealand government to initiate an inquiry into the physical and sexual abuse of children and disabled people held in state institutions. More>>

ALSO:

(Not National): Cross-Party Agreement On Pike River Re-Entry

The commitment was signed this afternoon by the leaders of Labour, United Future, The Maori Party, and the Green Party and, together with the earlier commitment by New Zealand First, means that there is now a Parliamentary majority behind the families’ fight for truth and justice. More>>

ALSO:

Earlier:

Mental Health Foundation: 'Positive First Steps'

“The heavy reliance on pilots and targeted approaches in the package announced today makes it plain that additional funding will be needed so that activities that work can be made available throughout New Zealand,” says Mr Robinson. More>>

ALSO:

'Gift' To NZ: Synod Considers Third Christchurch Cathedral Option

Members of the Anglican Diocese of Christchurch will consider three, not two, options regarding the future of the ChristChurch Cathedral... The new option is for the Synod to gift the Cathedral building to the Government for the people of New Zealand. More>>

ALSO:

PM's Presser: Labour's Water Policy 'Reckless', Says English

The Labour Party has "bumbled into" its policy to charge for water in a "reckless" way that would put a Labour-led government on a collision course with both Maori and other water users, Prime Minister Bill English said at his weekly post-Cabinet press conference.. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

Featured InfoPages

Opening the Election