Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Info sharing evening on dam, other Whangarei flood work

28 March, 2014

Info sharing evening on dam, other Whangarei flood work

Members of the public are being invited to an upcoming information sharing evening to discuss a number of Whangarei-based flood projects, including an $8m-plus stormwater detention dam in Raumanga.

The Kotuku detention dam is part of a multi-phase project to reduce the impact of flooding in Whangarei’s Central Business District and parts of Morningside and Raumanga, which also involves river clearance to remove blockages and recent upgrading of the city’s Rust Ave Bridge to improve stream flows beneath it.

Bruce Howse, Land/Rivers Senior Programme Manager for the Northland Regional Council, says with the Rust Ave bridge project now largely complete and physical construction of the dam due to begin within months, the council is keen to update interested members of the public on the various local projects.

“Anyone interested is welcome to attend the information-sharing evening, which will be held at council’s Water St offices from 6pm on Wednesday 16 April.”

Mr Howse says the dam will be paid for via a targeted rate on more than 17,000 properties in the CBD and contributing catchment areas and will be one of the largest engineering projects undertaken by the regional council.

When completed about the middle of next year, the 18-metre high dam (to sit at the ends of Raumanga Valley Road and Kotuku Street) will hold up to 1.27 million cubic metres of floodwater during heavy rain.

“That’s about two-thirds of the capacity of the existing Whau Valley dam. But unlike the Whau Valley dam, which provides much of the city’s drinking water, the Kotuku dam works by slowly releasing trapped stormwater over a couple of days, reducing river swelling and downstream flooding that would otherwise threaten the CBD, parts of Morningside and the Raumanga Stream floodplain during a storm.”

Mr Howse says the targeted rate that will pay for the dam was established under the council’s last Long Term Plan (LTP) in 2012.

“When the LTP was written two years ago, the dam’s cost was estimated at about $6.9M (excluding GST), but this has since been revised upwards to almost $8.5M. The new figure is a refinement based on completion of a more detailed dam design, peer review outcomes, quotes to relocate services like gas and power/fibre and progress with land acquisitions.”

Despite the revised cost, Mr Howse says the council has not changed (and is not consulting on changing) the Whangarei Urban Rivers Management Rate as part of its proposed Draft Annual Plan (DAP) 2014/15. A month-long public consultation period on the DAP – which sets out the council’s budgets and activities for the 12 months from July – begins on Monday. (SUBS: 31 March).

However, Mr Howse says the council is likely to consider increasing the targeted rate in future as project costs do become more certain, probably in time for the adoption of the Long Term Plan 2015-2025 next year.

He says the council expects to offset some of the increased dam project costs by on-selling all or parts of some of the 20 properties it’s purchasing for it as not all the land would be required long term.

“Obviously, we’ll consult with the public on any planned change to the targeted rate in future. In the meantime, we’ll continue to work with both the Urban Whangarei Rivers Liaison Committee and the wider community on this project to ensure it remains affordable.”

Meanwhile, Mr Howse says as well as discussing the dam project at the 16 April meeting, people would also be able to learn more about the Rust Ave bridge work, which was a joint project between the regional and Whangarei District Councils and national road funding body Land Transport NZ.

He says the Whangarei works form an integral part of the regional council’s Northland-wide ‘priority rivers project’ which involves 26 catchments across Northland; 16 in the Far North, eight in Whangarei and two in Kaipara.

“The rivers and streams in these priority catchments pose potential threats to lives, buildings, road access, infrastructure and agriculture and we’re working with communities to help reduce these risks where practical.”

Mr Howse says anyone interested in the Whangarei works – or the wider priority rivers project – can also visit the council’s website via: www.nrc.govt.nz/priorityrivers

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Parliament Today:

Parliament Restarts: Prime Minister’s Statement

Our policy agenda and legislative programme will reflect the Government’s four priorities: • to responsibly manage the Government’s finances • to build a more competitive and productive economy • to deliver better public services to New Zealanders, an • to support the rebuilding of Christchurch. More>>

ALSO:

NZEI Survey Report: Special Needs Students Missing Out

The survey revealed that around 16 percent of students were on schools’ special needs registers, but nearly 90 percent of schools’ special needs coordinators did not believe there was adequate support for students and their learning... More>>

ALSO:

Interim Report: Waitangi Tribunal On Ture Whenua Legislation

Labour on Proposed changes to Maori land rules: “To have Treaty Negotiations Minister Chris Finlayson dismiss findings as ‘bizarre’ is totally disingenuous and disrespectful. What’s bizarre is Maori Development Minister Te Ururoa Flavell stubbornly pushing through this Bill before the Waitangi Tribunal has even completed its report..." More>>

ALSO:

Spy Update: Appointment Of GCSB Acting Director

GCSB Chief Legal Advisor Lisa Fong will become the Acting Director of the Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB) from 15 February 2016, Minister Responsible for the GCSB Christopher Finlayson announced today. More>>

Protests Close Roads: TPP Signed In Auckland

“TPP was signed by Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, the United States and Viet Nam.” More>>

ALSO:

Emails Behind 'Diplomatic Immunity' Case: Whitehead Report Released

“As previously indicated the conclusions reached by Mr Whitehead’s investigation are not unexpected but they are very disappointing,” Mr Mccully says. “At the heart of the matter is a single email, along with procedural shortcomings, which gave Malaysian officials the impression it would be acceptable for Mr Rizalman to return to Malaysia." More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Treaty/TPP Overlap, And Iowa

The fears about the ISDS provisions in the Trans Pacific Partnership deal are well-founded. The reality is that there is a sharp uptick in the occurrence of ISDS litigation in developed countries, and even the right wing likes of The Economist have been souring on the process for some time. More>>

ALSO:

Christchurch Red Zone Offers: Fresh High Court Proceedings

Grant Cameron, Solicitor for the Quake Outcasts said “the action seeks judicial review of the Crown’s recent decision to make a fresh offer to purchase properties from uninsured property owners in red zones. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news