Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


DOC Kiwi Removals Facing Opposition

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
31 MARCH 2014

DOC Kiwi Removals Facing Opposition

Citing conflicting statements from DoC on kiwi population health and the agency’s failure to gain proper iwi approvals, Coromandel conservation groups are seeking to halt DoC kiwi translocation from the top of the peninsula and are questioning department management strategies that directly affect the species locally.

DoC plans to initially relocate 10 brown kiwi from Mt Moehau to Motutapu in the Hauraki Gulf, with highly publicised corporate sponsorship by global drug and pesticide manufacturer Bayer, in a move they say will improve the long-term outlook for the species. Additional removals totaling 50 birds are planned on the peninsula.

The Upper Coromandel Landcare Association (UCLA), which is opposing kiwi removals from the mountain, says DoC statements on population health are contradictory and unreliable. The group is demanding definitive independent research on kiwi numbers and population dynamics on Moehau to guide management strategies, including any further translocations.

UCLA points to a positive 2007 assessment by DOC’s Hauraki area manager that claimed more than 70 percent kiwi survival rates on Moehau. That report stated, “The simple recipe of predator trapping and hard work on the hill has produced this exceptional result.” DoC reported kiwi numbers were increasing at a rate of 15 percent per year and were far below carrying capacity.

However, according to UCLA spokesperson Reihana Robinson, one Coromandel iwi group was recently told the kiwi population on Moehau is declining. “DoC can’t have it both ways,” she said. “First they say the kiwi population is healthy with more than 300 adult pairs and growing, yet iwi being lobbied for support of the translocation plan by DoC are being told the population is dropping.” According to Robinson, an independent surveyor of Moehau kiwi calls recently told her group, “No one really knows how many birds are on Moehau.”

UCLA is also disputing DoC claims that the “Coromandel brown kiwi” is a distinct taxonomic unit that requires island relocation to survive. “Whether such marginal genetic distinction is of any significance and whether inbreeding will contribute in any meaningful way survival is highly questionable,” Robinson said. “The fact is no one at DoC can say what the so-called genomic difference actually is. In fact, they say, taxonomic status has yet to be formally determined.”

According to Robinson, DoC has also failed to obtain proper and appropriate permissions for the translocation programme. “When requested, Doc could provide only two written confirmation of iwi support, while claiming they had other so-called ‘verbal’ approvals from unnamed representatives on what DoC says were ‘unknown’ exact dates,” she said.

“Of even greater concern, UCLA has been advised by a Te Arawa iwi spokesperson that, ‘As far as we're aware "NO" such permission has been granted from Te Arawa Iwi to DOC for the translocation of kiwi from Moehau to Motutapu’.” Moehau is the sacred resting place of the Arawa chief Tama te Kapua.

UCLA says the agency is engaged in an image-burnishing public relations exercise reflecting its new direction and focus on marketing opportunities with corporates -- at the expense of the mountain’s resident kiwi population.

“We are seriously concerned DoC is mismanaging our iconic bird here on the Coromandel,” Robinson said. “If kiwi are in fact on the decline since 2007, it should be noted this is when the use of toxin 1080 started on Moehau’s eastern flank. In 2013, an aerial drop blanketed the entire mountain for the first time, and the poison is known to put juvenile kiwi at risk. DoC should leave the kiwi in peace, and the agency should continue the hard work of stoat trapping on our maunga.” says Robinson.

The removal of kiwi from Moehau is also opposed by Coromandel conservation group Manu Waiata and the Thames Landcare Association.


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Bullish On China Shopping: Trade Minister On Premier's Visit

Q+A: Trade Minister Todd McClay – not ruling out a conversation around Chinese workers coming to New Zealand to work on infrastructure projects as part of trade talks:

‘Yeah, well, that’s not something that’s on the table at the moment, but, look, what we’ve agreed as part of the, you know, when we start the upgrade negotiation, both sides can raise issues that are of importance to them. We’ve got a list of things we want to talk about. China may well have.’ More>>

 

Little Heading For Court: Apology Over Donation/Hotel Contract Claims Not Accepted

Today I want to publicly apologise unreservedly to Mr Hagaman for any hurt, embarrassment or adverse reflection on his reputation which may have resulted from my various media statements. I have offered that apology to the Hagamans. More>>

ALSO:

Biscuit Tin Of Democracy: World Heritage Site Protection, Ombudsman and Equal Pay Bills Drawn

On Thursday, 23 March 2017 three places are available on the Order Paper for the first reading of a Member’s bill. The ballot was held, and resulted in the following bills being drawn... More>>

ALSO:

Emissions Plan: NZ Needs More Science, More Trees, Fewer Beasts

A combination of technology breakthroughs, much more plantation forestry, and a big switch away from pastoral, particularly dairy farming, are identified as the key elements of any approach New Zealand takes to reducing its carbon emissions to a net zero level, according to a new report sponsored by the New Zealand chapter of GLOBE, a multi-party, global parliamentary grouping. More>>

ALSO:

"Backed To Win Seats": Labour Māori Seat MPs Won't Stand On List

The Labour Party is backing a request from its Māori seat MPs to stand as electorate MPs only, says Labour Leader Andrew Little. More>>

OutsKey: John Key's Valedictory Speech

I rise to address this House for the very last time. It has been a huge privilege to have served the people of Helensville as their member of Parliament, and, of course, the people of New Zealand as their Prime Minister. More>>

ALSO:

Productivity Commission: New Models Of Tertiary Education Are Coming

The report is a broad-ranging inquiry into how well New Zealand’s tertiary education system is set up to respond to emerging trends in technology and the internationalisation of education, and changes in the structure of the population, and the skills needed in the economy and society... More>>

ALSO:

PM's Press Conference: Water Everywhere

Monday's Post-Cabinet press conference focused on water, with the Prime Minister fielding questions about the possibility pricing water taken for export. Mr English said the government was directing their water allocation technical advisory group to include export water in considerations. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news