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Canterbury DHB & Council land swap receives approval

Canterbury DHB & Council land swap receives stamp of approval


Canterbury District Health Board and the Christchurch City Council have swapped two parcels of land, which will provide space for the much-needed redevelopment of Christchurch Hospital.

The parcels of land are similar in size and both located at the rear of Christchurch Hospital.

This land swap will allow space for a state-of-the-art acute services wing to be built behind Christchurch Women’s and adjoining Christchurch Hospital. This new building is due for completion in 2018.

Murray Cleverley, Canterbury District Health Board chair, said he wanted to acknowledge the cooperation of Ngāi Tahu who played a critical role in enabling this land swap to occur by deferring its Right of First Refusal.

“While Ngāi Tahu is entitled, as part of its 1998 Settlement, to the Right of First Refusal on surplus Crown Land within its rohe, the iwi is making an exception in this special case for the greater good of the community. The iwi will retain its right to purchase the property in the first instance if either the Christchurch City Council or Canterbury DHB ever declares either parcel of land surplus to requirements in the future,” Mr Cleverley said.

“Public consultation on this land swap took place early in 2010 and the feedback on the proposal was largely supportive, as people could see the potential health benefits for the Canterbury community, and for those from throughout the South Island and some patients from the lower North Island who travel to Christchurch for treatment and care.”

Lianne Dalziel, Mayor of Christchurch, also emphasised the collaborative nature of the swap.

“Exchanging these land parcels is a pragmatic and constructive solution to allow Christchurch Hospital room to expand,” she said.

“This area is an important part of our city and we’ll be working closely with the Canterbury DHB to minimise the impact on the surrounding environment.”
The acute services wing project, together with the Burwood Health Campus developments, form part of the biggest ever public hospital works in New Zealand history and are expected to cost over $600 million.


Frequently-asked questions:
Does Ngāi Tahu have Rights of First Refusal on all surplus Crown Land within its rohe?
As part of the settlement of the Ngāi Tahu Claim, Ngāi Tahu negotiated a Right of First Refusal on most Crown land to be sold or made surplus within the Ngāi Tahu rohe (region / area).

The Right requires all Government entities contemplating the sale of Crown land to give Ngāi Tahu, initially a Preliminary Notice and finally a Disposal Notice, detailing price and terms and conditions that the Crown is prepared to sell the surplus property at. Ngāi Tahu has a period of time in which to conclude a deal with the Crown entity selling the property and the Crown is required to negotiate in good faith. If Ngāi Tahu does not purchase the property, the Crown body is then able to place the property on the open market, but cannot sell at more favourable terms than those already offered to Ngāi Tahu.

The Right of First Refusal is an economic instrument designed to rebuild the Ngāi Tahu economic base. It is enshrined in law and details of it can be found in Part 9 of the Ngāi Tahu Claims Settlement Act 1998.


When is the new building on the Christchurch Hospital site likely to start?
Site preparation work is currently scheduled to begin in May-June 2014. The construction phase will commence later, with the building to be completed in 2018.

ENDS

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