Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Earlier closing proposed for bars and off-licences

Earlier closing proposed for bars and off-licences


Gisborne bars could be empty by 2am on a Friday and Saturday night if Gisborne District Council’s draft Local Alcohol Policy is adopted.

The policy is about limiting harm from alcohol in this district by having safe and healthy alcohol licensing criteria. Gisborne has higher than average rates of alcohol-related injury and crime, says community planning and development group manager Nedine Thatcher-Swann.

“Research into alcohol issues in the Gisborne district showed that alcohol is a significant factor in at least half the deaths in people under 24 years old and that 30 percent of weekend visits to A&E are alcohol related. Accessibility to alcohol in Gisborne is high when compared to national data.”

The Gisborne District Licensing Committee will use the Local Alcohol Policy (LAP) as a guide when making decisions about where, when, how and who should be licensed to sell or serve alcohol. The draft policy aims to ensure decisions made by the committee balance business and social interests.

“One of the key changes proposed is to close all bars at 2am; currently bars close at 3am. From 1am there would be a one-way door policy in place meaning anyone leaving the bar would not be allowed back in.”

“Changes are also proposed for off-licences. Off-licences, like supermarkets, bottle stores and clubs, would be able to sell alcohol to take away between 10am and 9pm. Current hours are between 7am and 11pm. The number of off-licences would be capped at current levels. There will be sensitive locations, for example by schools, where only new cafes and restaurants can be licensed to sell alcohol – no bars.”

“It is proposed that licensed clubs would be able to sell alcohol between 10am and 11pm Sunday to Thursday and between 10am and 12pm on Friday and Saturday. Current hours are 8am till 4am.”

“It is important that organisations that are licensed to serve or sell alcohol are prepared to look after their customers responsibly. It is proposed that everyone applying for a license will present an Alcohol Management Plan.”
“Council is now asking for feedback on the changes proposed so communities in the Gisborne district can help decide what kind of alcohol outlets we want and how accessible we want them to be.”

The Local Alcohol Policy was drafted after a series of workshops and community meetings last year. Many of those impacted by, or working with those impacted by, the use of alcohol in the district, attended the workshops. The policy aims to balance the positive economic benefits of the sale and supply of alcohol as part of major events and the hospitality industry, while limiting harm from alcohol.

The draft Local Alcohol Policy and submission form is on Council’s website or pick up a copy at the HB Williams Memorial Library, Customer Service in Fitzherbert Street or Te Puia Springs.

You can also text your feedback along with your full name and street address to 027 530 3323.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Gordon Campbell: On The Ombudsman’s Verdict On Paula Rebstock And Ian Rennie

Unfortunately, the brave and damning report by Ombudsman Ron Paterson on the “flawed” and “unfair” inquiry conducted by Dame Paula Rebstock into events at MFAT pulls back the veil on a far wider issue. More>>

ALSO:

Charities' Report: Stressed Families - Overstretched Services

“Like so many of the whānau and families they serve social service organisations are under huge financial stress. The support demanded from desperate people in communities is far outreaching the resources available.” More>>

ALSO:

Detention: Wellingtonians Protest Treatment Of Refugees

Peace Action Wellington (PAW) and around 50 Wellingtonians blockaded the Australian High Commission, creating a symbolic detention centre to protest the Australian Government's policy of mandatory offshore detention for refugees and asylum seekers. More>>

ALSO:

Diver's Alarums: Breach Means Training Provider Must Repay $1.47 Million

The New Zealand School of Outdoor Studies is to repay $1.47 million (GST-exclusive) to the Tertiary Education Commission (TEC) following an investigation which showed that some student enrolments between 2009 -2014 could not be validated and that courses were under-delivered against their agreement with the TEC. More>>

ALSO:

Education: Government Plans Suggest Bulk Funding Return

Plans by the Government to return to bulk funding are likely to see increased class sizes and schools most in need missing out on much-needed resources, Labour’s Acting Education spokesperson Grant Robertson says. More>>

ALSO:

Interim Report: Auckland Looks Long Term To Pay-Per-Km Road Pricing

Aucklanders can expect to be paying variable rates per kilometre to travel on the city's most congested roads under an emerging transport strategy being formulated by the government and the Auckland Council. More>>

ALSO:

Despite Promises: Government Extends Iraq Deployment

Cabinet has agreed to extend New Zealand’s contribution to the joint New Zealand-Australia mission to train Iraqi Security Forces until November 2018. More>>

ALSO:

On The 'Terrorism' Card:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news