Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Poplar, willow planting season looms

15 May, 2014

Poplar, willow planting season looms

Landowners keen to better protect their properties from erosion are being urged to investigate whether they might qualify for subsidised poplars and willows ahead of Northland’s looming winter planting season.

Councillor Joe Carr, who chairs the Northland Regional Council’s Environmental Management Committee, says the trees have been planted for many years to reduce erosion, help control nutrient losses and decrease waterway pollution.

“Both species have extensive root systems which help bind soil and prevent erosion and council promotes their use both as part of its soil conservation and water quality work.”

He says the council is often asked why it is promoting the use of non-native species like poplar and willow for erosion control.

“While in many other apsects of council’s work we actively support the use of native plants, we encourage the use of non-natives for erosion control because their fast growth rate means they’re able to provide stability to our land and streamsides much more quickly.”

Councillor Carr says stabilising land – and associated reductions in both erosion and and subsequent sedimentation – is essential.

“Sediment is one of Northland’s biggest water contaminants and most of the phosphorous in our harbour systems has arrived there attached to sediment from erosion.”

He says the best time to plant the trees in Northland is typically during the winter months of June to August and recognising their value, the council is once again offering subsidised supplies of willow and poplar pole material.

“Unlike older varieties, these have been specifically bred to weed out undesirable traits like heavy, brittle limbs and/or vigorous suckering. They also have better resistance to pests and disease and improved timber values.”

Councillor Carr says the regional council will meet up to half the cost of poplar and willows for 2014 planting, but with about 4000 poles available, stock is limited with demand usually exceeding supply.

The bulk of this year’s pole supply is being sourced from a Cambridge supplier – about half of which have already been allocated – with several hundred more on order from the limited number of Northland-based suppliers offering them.

“That demand and relative lack of local supply is one of the reasons council decided to invest in its own poplar and willow nursery in Flyger Rd, Mata last year.”

He says the council has spent about $65,000 establishing the five hectare nursery to date, but hopes to be able to meet much of the growing Northland demand for poplars and willows within several years.

Councillor Carr encourages those considering planting poplars and willows to contact the council’s land management team on (0800) 002 004 for advice and points out orders for this year’s subsidised stocks will close at the end of this month. (SUBS: on Friday May 30)

“There are conditions and that May 30 deadline could be even earlier if this year’s supplies are fully allocated before then.”

Councillor Carr says trees are usually supplied as ‘poles’, ‘stakes’ or ‘wands’ which have been grown over two seasons.

“Poles are larger (typically about three-metres long) than the stakes and wands which are usually about a metre to 1.5m long.”

He says poles need to be transported carefully to avoid damaging the bark (creating the risk of disease or the cutting drying out) and should ideally be soaked in fresh flowing water for 8-10 days prior to planting.

There are also a number of other considerations that need to be taken into account, including where the trees are sited and the ongoing care and maintenance they’ll require.

“Our land management team can help with this as well as free advice on the best species to use.”

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

"To Help Families Get Ahead": April 1 Changes Kick In

Prime Minister John Key says Paid Parental Leave, the parental tax credit, the minimum wage and Superannuation will increase, while average ACC levies will fall, and more people will be helped in to home ownership...

“The National-led Government has focused on ensuring gains from our growing economy flow through to families and these measures demonstrate that.” More>>

 

PARLIAMENT TODAY:

Climate: Ministers Exclude Emissions From ‘Environment Reporting'

The National Party Government has today revealed that the national environmental report topics for this year will, incredibly, exclude New Zealand’s greenhouse gas emissions, the Green Party said today. More>>

ALSO:

No Retrial: Freedom At Last For Teina Pora

The Māori Party is relieved that the Privy Council has cleared the final legal hurdle for Teina Pora who was wrongfully convicted of murder and sent to prison for 22 years. More>>

ALSO:

Germanwings Crash: Privacy Act Supports Aviation Safeguards In New Zealand

Reports that German privacy laws may have contributed to the Germanwings air crash have prompted New Zealand’s Privacy Commissioner to reassure the public that the Privacy Act is no impediment to medical practitioners notifying appropriate authorities to a pilot’s health concerns. More>>

ALSO:

Treaty: Taranaki Iwi Ngāruahine Settles Treaty Claims For $67.5mln

The settlement includes a $13.5 million payment the government made in June 2013, as well as land in the Taranaki region. The settlement also includes four culturally significant sites, the Waipakari Reserve, Te Kohinga Reserve, Te Ngutu o te Manu and Te Poho o Taranaki. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On A Funeral In Asia, The Northland By-Election, And News Priorities

Supposedly, New Zealand’s destiny lies in Asia, and that was one of Foreign Minister Murray McCully’s rationales for his bungled reforms at MFAT. OK. So, if that’s the case why didn’t Prime Minister John Key attend the state funeral on Sunday of Singapore’s founding leader Lee Kuan Yew? More>>

ALSO:

Werewolf Satire: Not Flag-Waving; Flag-Drowning

The panel choosing the flag options has no visual artists at all. Now, I’ve kerned the odd ligature in my time and I know my recto from my French curve so I thought I’d offer a few suggestions before they get past their depth. More>>

ALSO:

IPCA Reports: Significant Problems In Police Custody

In releasing two reports today, the Independent Police Conduct Authority has highlighted a number of significant problems with the way in which Police deal with people who are detained in Police cells. More>>

ALSO:

Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security: Inquiry Into GCSB Pacific Allegations

The complaints follow recent public allegations about GCSB activities. The complaints, and these public allegations, raise wider questions regarding the collection, retention and sharing of communications data. More>>

ALSO:

TPPA Investment Leak: "NZ Surrender To US" On Corporates Suing Governments

Professor Jane Kelsey: ‘As anticipated, the deal gives foreign investors from the TPPA countries special rights, and the power to sue the government in private offshore tribunals for massive damages if new laws, or even court decisions, significantly affected their bottom line’. More>>

ALSO:

Werewolf: The Myth Of Steven Joyce

Gordon Campbell: The myth of competence that’s been woven around Steven Joyce – the Key government’s “Minister of Everything” and “Mr Fixit” – has been disseminated from high-rises to hamlets, across the country... More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news