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University campus the biggest remediation project

University campus the biggest remediation project in Canterbury, Hawkins says

June 2, 2014

The University of Canterbury campus is believed to be the largest remediation project currently being carried out in Canterbury, a leading national construction company says.

The university is well on the pathway to recovery following the 2010 and 2011 earthquakes, highlighted by the reopening of the College of Business and Law building last week.

Hawkins Construction, the university’s main contractor for repairing buildings, says it has already delivered 18 building projects to date with more due for completion this year.

``We believe that this remediation project is progressing at an impressive pace, setting a positive benchmark for all earthquake remediation projects in Christchurch, which Hawkins is proud to be part of,’’ Hawkins South Island manager Steve Taw says.

``Considering the scale of this campus project and taking into account the number of different work places, personnel on site and subcontractors, we believe that it is the largest remediation project currently being carried out in Canterbury,’’ Taw says.

In the last year, the Business and Law building underwent an $8.3 million makeover and has been redesigned to provide a high quality learning and teaching environment.

The campus remediation project is a direct result of the earthquakes but has been an opportunity to enhance the buildings both in structural strength and in modernisation to keep the campus at the forefront of the university community and make buildings better suited to modern teaching and learning requirements.

``The remedial works have been an example of collaboration with a number of parties such as the university itself, students, other professional organisations such as project management companies Inovo Projects and the Project Office along with a number of design team professionals, coming together to provide solutions to some very complex construction issues,’’ Taw says.

``Carrying out repair and upgrade works while it is business as usual on campus has been one of the biggest challenges for Hawkins, but a necessity to ensure minimal disruption is caused.

``The average number of people working on the University of Canterbury project over the last month averaged 470. At the peak over summer, the numbers rose to 560. There are 45 subcontract companies working on site.

``Two additional projects not directly related to earthquake works were also completed last summer. They were the Innes Road conversion of four existing buildings to provide additional accommodation for 80 beds and temporary accommodation at the Waimairi village of 16 four bed houses.

``A spin-off has been that Hawkins has provided work experience to seven university students over the summer break in supplementary site supervision roles.

``As well as 15 arts students, working for one of Hawkins contractors, carried out specialist colouring of concrete to ensure that new repairs match existing colouring,’’ Taw says.
ends

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