Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Ruakituri River decision

Ruakituri River decision


Eastern Fish and Game Council lifts boat restrictions Ruato Bay, changes other fishing rules


The Eastern Fish and Game Council has moved to amend some of its fishing rules after anglers were given their say on a variety of proposed changes.

The Council met last week to consider proposed changes to the Angler’s Notice which lays down the fishing rules and regulations for the region.

Councillors agreed to remove the ‘no-boat fishing’ restrictions around Ruato Bay on Lake Rotoiti, in a move which will take effect from the next fishing season which begins on October 1 2014.

Council chairman Murray Ferris says the autumn restriction on fishing from a boat in this area is being lifted because a three year trial to see if this improved shoreline fishing had shown no change in winter catch rates.

Another rule change applies to Lake Tarawera – the Eastern Council decided to lower the maximum size limit for wild trout from 65cm to 62cm.

Mr Ferris says that even dropping from 65cm to 62cm, the impact on most anglers who catch mainly hatchery fish in the lake, will be minimal.

“The limit is important to protect large wild trout, and assist the Tarawera Selective Breeding programme that sources parent fish to grow in the hatchery, and produce fingerlings which are released across many North Island lakes.”

A proposal to allow some bait fishing (scented soft baits, insect and worm) in Lake Okaro or Okareka was put on hold to gather more information. The current prohibition on using baits in the Rotorua lakes will continue to apply.

The Council also agreed to restrict the use of motors and anchors for fishing in the Tuai Lakes near Waikaremoana (Lake Whakamarino and Kaitawa) to help protect the valuable Waikaremoana fishery from weed being transferred from the smaller lakes.

Mr Ferris says that one of the more contentious proposals was to permit spin fishing in the lower reaches of the Ruakituri River and allow anglers to fish the same section all year. The unanimous decision of the Council was to stay with the “status quo” and gather more information on the fishery.

The vote to leave unchanged the current regulations was taken after some discussion, and hearing from Ruakituri locals including a spokesman for the Ruakituri Resident’s and Ratepayer’s Association.

Eastern Council Chairman Murray Ferris describes the decision as a commonsense and democratic one, which shows the council has listened to the concerns of local landowners and residents.

“We regret that our proposal became the subject of a great deal of mis-information and emotion – in particular the completely false suggestion that the whole river would be opened to spin fishing.

“The proposed change only ever applied to the lower section of the river but regrettably the facts were misrepresented. There is good science and many years of research that shows the fishery would sustain some additional angling and we are obliged to increase angler opportunities where we can. However we can’t so this without taking key stakeholders along with us so we have more work to do in this area. ”

Mr Ferris says that he has already noted that staff will take steps to meet with landowners and try and better explain that the aim of the proposal had been to create opportunities for younger or novice anglers in particular to fish in a part of the renowned East Coast river — especially as the lower part is less heavily fished than the upper reaches.

Ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell:
On War Crimes And The Afghan Insurgency

Truly, with friends like former defence Minster Wayne Mapp, the SAS does not need enemies. At the very least, the Hit and Run book has raised the possibility that the New Zealand SAS committed war crimes in the attack they led in Afghnistan upon the villages of Naik and Khak Khuday Dad...

Mapp’s attempted defence of the SAS on RNZ this morning unintentionally indicated that collective punishment was baked into the planning exercise for the raid, and also into how the raid proceeded on the ground. More>>

 

Biscuit Tin Of Democracy: World Heritage Site Protection, Ombudsman and Equal Pay Bills Drawn

On Thursday, 23 March 2017 three places are available on the Order Paper for the first reading of a Member’s bill. The ballot was held, and resulted in the following bills being drawn... More>>

ALSO:

Emissions Plan: NZ Needs More Science, More Trees, Fewer Beasts

A combination of technology breakthroughs, much more plantation forestry, and a big switch away from pastoral, particularly dairy farming, are identified as the key elements of any approach New Zealand takes to reducing its carbon emissions to a net zero level, according to a new report sponsored by the New Zealand chapter of GLOBE, a multi-party, global parliamentary grouping. More>>

ALSO:

"Backed To Win Seats": Labour Māori Seat MPs Won't Stand On List

The Labour Party is backing a request from its Māori seat MPs to stand as electorate MPs only, says Labour Leader Andrew Little. More>>

Productivity Commission: New Models Of Tertiary Education Are Coming

The report is a broad-ranging inquiry into how well New Zealand’s tertiary education system is set up to respond to emerging trends in technology and the internationalisation of education, and changes in the structure of the population, and the skills needed in the economy and society... More>>

ALSO:

PM's Press Conference: Water Everywhere

Monday's Post-Cabinet press conference focused on water, with the Prime Minister fielding questions about the possibility pricing water taken for export. Mr English said the government was directing their water allocation technical advisory group to include export water in considerations. More>>

ALSO:

Kim Workman: Reality Check Needed For Public Service Reoffending Target

Reducing the prison population results in a reduction in re-offending. Shortening sentences reduces reoffending... More>>

ALSO:

PSA: Minister Should Stop Dodging On Salisbury School

"The decision around the future of Salisbury School has been overdue for months, and the ambiguity is leaving parents, staff and students in limbo. It’s time the Minister stopped hiding, muddying the waters and being dishonest about her Ministry’s intentions," says Erin Polaczuk, PSA national secretary. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news