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Picking Up After the Storm


Picking Up After the Storm

The storm which ravaged the Coromandel almost two weeks ago has had a devastating effect on many residents particularly those in Port Jackson and Sandy Bay north of Port Charles.

Thames-Coromandel Mayor Glenn Leach, Chief Executive David Hammond along with Roading Manager Matt Busch and Coromandel-Colville Community Board Ward Councillor Tony Brljevich toured the area on Friday talking to those hit hardest.

"It is very hard to get a handle on the amount of debris, silt and rocks that came down the Port Jackson catchment," said Mayor Leach. "I find the situation very disturbing and am thankful that nobody was hurt."

Early costs for damage to roads and road infrastructure are estimated at $900,000.00. The Council's contribution to this is approximately $500,000.00 with $170,000 being paid out of the 2013/2014 budget and the balance out of the 2014/2015 budget. The estimated costs for water services are around $25,000.00, with estimates from Parks and Reserves still yet to come.

Roading contractors, Transfield Services, have been praised for the quick response and hard work to ensure the road was open. Contractors even rescued a pair of korora, or little blue penguin, trapped in a culvert while flushing culverts, much to the surprise of both parties.

Waikato Regional Councillors and staff have visited the sites. Clyde Graf shot a video of the flood damage at Port Jackson which can be seen on YouTube http://youtu.be/em5yCfJcm3w .

"The clean-up has only just begun, but I believe it will be a long time before anyone here forgets the enormity of the storm and the consequences," Mayor Leach added.


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