Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Natural Environment Recovery Programme progress

Natural Environment Recovery Programme progress


At a forum in Christchurch last night, many of those who helped develop the Natural Environment Recovery Programme for greater Christchurch Whakaara Taiao learned more about the considerable progress being made across the 17 workstreams that make up the programme.

Programme leader Chrissie Williams (Environment Canterbury) thanked the group responsible for guiding the projects reflecting 10 different themes.

Reporting on the Te Papa Ōtākaro/Avon River Precinct project in the central city, Tanya Neville of the Christchurch Central Development Unit illustrated the key components of the 3.2-kilometre, 25-hectare area that will reconnect people to the river. This project will be completed by the end of 2015.

Clive Appleton of Christchurch City Council reflected on the water quality and ecosystem health focuses of the Council’s stormwater treatment and land drainage recovery programme. Rain gardens are a particularly innovative feature of this programme.

Bailey Peryman of the Soil and Health Association said how pleased his organisation was to be selected to lead the project encouraging community gardens, urban forests and a food reliance network.

Rob Lawrence (Canterbury Employers Chamber of Commerce) spoke on behalf of the group promoting the Waitākiri Sanctuary in the Travis Wetland area of eastern Christchurch. Evan Smith of the Avon Ōtākaro Network talked about the mahinga kai exemplar project in the same location. This 12-hectare area features 11 outdoor “classrooms” focusing on different habitats and species.

Andrew Crossland of Christchurch City Council concluded the forum by providing a striking update on bird populations since the earthquakes. While there has been a large redistribution and some colonies have been deserted, new habitat has also been created.

Environment Canterbury Commissioner Rex Williams, who opened the forum, says the Natural Environment Recovery Programme is important for the future wellbeing of Cantabrians.
“Our natural environment is a central part of our shared heritage and culture. Many of us live here because we value the natural environment - the rivers, the beaches and harbours, the forests and Port Hills - and the activities these special places provide,” Mr Williams said.

“This initiative builds on a great deal of important work by many people and organisations that has been continuing for a number of years. It is very pleasing that such good progress is being made and I thank everyone involved. Of great importance to Ngāi Tahu is taking active responsibility for the environment so it is left better than it was found. There is much still to do and we all look forward to the challenge.”

Background

The Natural Environment Recovery Programme was initiated through the Recovery Strategy for greater Christchurch. It acknowledges the links between the natural environment and recovery, and integrates with other recovery programmes and objectives.

Seventeen projects led by different organisations are included in the programme to reflect priorities identified by the community - for example, there is a strong community desire for land made available being used to include provision for recreation, parks and community gardens.
Greater Christchurch is defined in the Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Act 2011 as the districts of Christchurch City Council, Selwyn District Council and Waimakariri District Council, and includes the coastal marine area adjacent to these districts.
The focus of the Natural Environment Recovery Programme is on areas most affected by the earthquakes - generally the catchments of the spring-fed streams (Halswell/Huritini, Heathcote/Ōpāwaho, Avon/Ōtākaro, Styx/Pūrākaunui, and Kaiapoi) and the Port Hills. There was less impact on the natural environment on Banks Peninsula and in inland areas.

Environment Canterbury was asked by the Minister for Canterbury Earthquake Recovery, Gerry Brownlee, to lead development of the programme in 2012. It was launched at an event at Travis Wetland in eastern Christchurch in November 2013.

The programme was developed with strategic partners Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu, Christchurch City Council, Waimakariri District Council, Selwyn District Council and the Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Authority. Ngā Papatipu Rūnanga, the Canterbury District Health Board and the Department of Conservation are also key partners. These organisations and a number of others are involved in delivering the 17 workstreams.

See www.ecan.govt.nz/nerp

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Werewolf Issue #49: Gordon Campbell Interviews Laila Harre

For 25 years, Labour and National have been in virtual agreement about the basics of economic policy, and differed mainly on how to go about managing its social consequences.

Such is the power of the economic orthodoxy that when opposition parties arise – say, in the shape of the Greens – their “credibility” is measured by the extent to which they give the appearance of learning and abiding by the ruling consensus.

The tension between the desire for change – and the inability of the current political framework to deliver it – creates openings for populists of all stripes. It is what has made the emergence of Internet Mana so interesting. More>>

 

Parliament Today:

Gordon Campbell: On National’s Electorate Deals

For all the talk yesterday from Prime Minister John Key about National being transparent about its electorate deals in Epsom and Ohariu, that transparency is entirely front-loaded. More>>

ALSO:

Greens: Oil Drilling Face-Off With Labour

The key policy points in the Green Party’s plan to protect our beaches from oil spills are to:
1. Prohibit deep sea oil drilling; 2. Implement compulsory shipping lanes for coastal shipping; 3. Build Maritime New Zealand’s oil spill response capability; and 4. Introduce a stronger legal framework so that when accidents do happen, the New Zealand taxpayer does not have to pay for the clean-up. More>>

ALSO:


Nick Smith v Fish & Game:

Minister Told Of FBI Investigation, Says INZ: Coleman Must Quit Or Be Sacked Over Dotcom Case - Harré

Immigration New Zealand has done the right thing in distancing itself from Jonathan Coleman’s claims that ministers were not aware of FBI involvement in Kim Dotcom’s residency application, says the Internet Party. More>>

ALSO:

Valedictory Season: Maori Party Founders Say Goodbye

Two major Maori MPs gave there farewell speeches to Parliament Thursday outlining their history, experiences, triumphs and regrets. More>>

ALSO:

Resignation Not Accepted: Transport Minister Breaches Aviation Security Rules

"Running late for a plane at Christchurch Airport, I without thought breached airport and airline security rules by entering the gate lounge through a door usually used for exit only..." More>>

ALSO:

TAIC Report: Urgent Recommendations After Melling Rail Accident

The Transport Accident Investigation Commission has made four urgent recommendations to KiwiRail following the accident two months ago (27 May) when a Matangi passenger train collided with a stop block at Melling Station, Lower Hutt. More>>

ALSO:

Red Tape: Local Regulations Go Under Microscope

The Government says it is accepting nearly all of the recommendations the Productivity Commission has made on ways to improve local regulations. More>>

ALSO:

Spending Questions: Claudette Hauiti To Step Aside At Election

National Party President Peter Goodfellow confirms that he has received notification from List MP Claudette Hauiti that she plans to step aside at the 20 September election. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news