Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 

Huge benefits from North Shore Riding for the Disabled

Huge benefits from North Shore Riding for the Disabled




Sophie Tuenter, 14, enjoys her time with horse Raisin


23 July 2014

The changes undergone by children who attend Riding for the Disabled can be dramatic.

10 year-old Imogen was born with Global Developmental Delay, and other intellectual disabilities. As a result she has difficulty focusing, interpreting situations and socialising with others.

Imogen’s mother Nicola says after starting at Riding for the Disabled the changes in Imogen were swift and noticed by friends, family and her school.

“Imogen has finally found something she adores. It has changed her whole persona from a little girl with no confidence and huge frustration to a happy and more focused child.”

The Harcourts Foundation, and Tandem Realty business owners Colin Hair and Nick Langdon, are supporting North Shore Riding for the Disabled through the donation of a $5,000 grant.

North Shore Riding for the Disabled president Andrea Elmer says it is greatly appreciated as the charity survives purely on donations and the goodwill of volunteers.

Over 90 children and young people from the North Shore and Rodney regularly attend North Shore Riding for the Disabled, which has been in operation since 1975.

The children have a wide range of disabilities, including cerebral palsy, autism, Down syndrome and other intellectual disabilities.

Andrea Elmer says as well as children and young people from their special satellite units, North Shore and Rodney schools also send some of their young people who they believe would benefit socially from the experience.

“It’s a kind of magic that happens when the kids come into contact with the horses. The horses may give our trainers a run for their money sometimes, but with the children they are calm and gentle. There is a connection between the horses and their young riders that is truly wonderful to see,” Andrea says.

In addition, the experience of riding a horse is very similar to the physiology of walking. This means children who have limited mobility are activating and relaxing the muscles of the trunk, spine, hips and pelvis while riding, which has huge therapeutic benefits.

The Harcourts Foundation to date has raised $2.6 million to help local groups improve the lives of their communities.

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell: On The Navy’s Dealings With Fat Leonard, And Twin Peaks

At an official level, our “she’ll be right” attitude routinely spills over into a keen resentment of anyone who suggests the outcomes may be less than satisfactory. Oversight at any level of performance is not New Zealand’s strong suit – from our one-chamber Parliament on downwards...

The Navy has now gone one step beyond. It won’t even ask itself whether it did a good job. More>>

 

NZDF: Fifth Rotation Of Troops Heads To Iraq

The fifth rotation of New Zealand Defence Force troops left today for a six-month mission training Iraqi soldiers. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Demonising Of Iran

Will New Zealand still be willing to pursue its recent trade overtures to Iran, now that US President Donald Trump has used his speech in Riyadh to single out Iran as the main source of terrorism and instability in the Middle East? More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 

Opening The Election Supporters

 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

Featured InfoPages

Opening the Election