Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Regional council committed to coastal co-operation

Regional council committed to Coromandel coastal co-operation

Waikato Regional Council says it is committed to working closely with Thames-Coromandel District Council (TCDC) and local communities to manage coastal hazard risks, such as erosion and flooding, in the face of any increased sea level and climate change pressures.

The comment follows the release of a statement from TCDC focusing on the need to manage the risk of coastal erosion on properties, a significant issue for a number of Coromandel communities.

The regional council has a solutions-focused role when it comes to addressing such problems in both the short and long terms. It researches the specific causes of erosion as part of its hazard management functions and has worked in a variety of ways to help TCDC and local communities better understand and manage the various hazards and risks. Also, as part of its regulatory role the regional council assesses the likely environmental effects of resource consent applications for “hard” structures, such as sea walls, and grants resource consent for such structures and beach replenishment where appropriate.

“With predicted sea level rise, and potential for more frequent severe weather events, under climate change, councils and communities collectively need to work together even more closely to manage the risks associated with coastal hazards,” said regional council chairperson Paula Southgate.

“The huge challenge we collectively face is balancing the protection of land and land-based assets with maintaining the natural character of beaches which are central to the attractiveness of coastal settlements – sometimes meeting both these goals can be difficult.

“The regional council recognises clearly the stress a number of Coromandel communities face due to coastal erosion and we are committed to working closely with TCDC and those communities on the best way to manage the situation, taking into account both the protection of property and the need to preserve the look and use of beaches.”

The ways in which the regional council has been helping manage erosion issues so far include:
· Advice to TCDC on “set back lines” to help avoid development in erosion-prone areas.

· $150,000 set aside for research into what can be done to manage coastal erosion in Mercury Bay in ways that won’t adversely affect beaches and still protect the land. (It’s commonly understood that coastal erosion causes are often complex and not well understood. There are examples of public money being spent on unsustainable solutions because not enough time has been taken to understand coastal processes.)

· The granting of a widespread consent to TCDC for “beach scraping” whereby sand can be moved around to help manage erosion. For example, erosion at Whangapoua during recent storms would have been more severe without works carried out after another big weather event in 2008.

· The Beachcare programme for dune restoration on the east coast which has planted and restored previously degraded dunes in many areas.

· Working closely with TCDC staff and politicians to take a strategic, long-term view of how best to manage erosion issues going forward.


“For our part, we recognize the frustration of Coromandel communities over the fact that there are no easy, comprehensive solutions to coastal erosion issues generally,” said Ms Southgate.

“Hard structures, such as sea walls, can have a role but they can also create problems by contributing to erosion elsewhere and affect the look and use of the beach. Other solutions, such as beach scraping to replenish eroded dunes, have their limitations.

“So it will be important for us all to keep working together closely to address the complexity of the issues involved in protecting our communities and the precious beaches of our region.

“During the consideration of our Long Term Plan the regional council will be looking at what further role we may play in managing coastal hazard risks in our coastal communities.”

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

AMA: Scoop's 'Invisible Paywall'

Operation Chrysalis: The Final Countdown - Thanks & There's Still Time To Pledge

Phew! We are now counting down the hours to the end of this crowd-funding campaign at 11pm on Sunday. Thankyou to all those Scoop readers and supporters who have pledged already. You have been awesome. But this is not over yet. More>>

 
 

PARLIAMENT TODAY:

IPCA Reports: Significant Problems In Police Custody

In releasing two reports today, the Independent Police Conduct Authority has highlighted a number of significant problems with the way in which Police deal with people who are detained in Police cells. More>>

ALSO:

Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security: Inquiry Into GCSB Pacific Allegations

The complaints follow recent public allegations about GCSB activities. The complaints, and these public allegations, raise wider questions regarding the collection, retention and sharing of communications data. More>>

ALSO:

TPPA Investment Leak: "NZ Surrender To US" On Corporates Suing Governments

Professor Jane Kelsey: ‘As anticipated, the deal gives foreign investors from the TPPA countries special rights, and the power to sue the government in private offshore tribunals for massive damages if new laws, or even court decisions, significantly affected their bottom line’. More>>

ALSO:

Werewolf: The Myth Of Steven Joyce

Gordon Campbell: The myth of competence that’s been woven around Steven Joyce – the Key government’s “Minister of Everything” and “Mr Fixit” – has been disseminated from high-rises to hamlets, across the country... More>>

ALSO:

RMTU: No Public Submissions On International Government Procurement Deal

“The government is preparing to assent to the Government Procurement Agreement, a World Trade Organisation Treaty which opens up New Zealand Government contracts to foreign companies and closes the door on local businesses and their workers. However the Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Select Committee is refusing to take public submissions on the decision.” More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell:
On Pacific Spying

So New Zealand spied on its friends and allies in the Pacific – and has not only been passing on the results to the NSA, but has apparently passed on the details of the Pacific’s relations with Taiwan to our other best friends, the Chinese. On the side, the Key government has also been using the security services to gauge the chances of Trade Minister Tim Groser landing the top job at the WTO... More>>

ALSO:

State Housing Transfer: Salvation Army Opts Out

The Salvation Army has decided against negotiating with Government for the transfer of Housing New Zealand stock.
More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news