Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Regional council committed to coastal co-operation

Regional council committed to Coromandel coastal co-operation

Waikato Regional Council says it is committed to working closely with Thames-Coromandel District Council (TCDC) and local communities to manage coastal hazard risks, such as erosion and flooding, in the face of any increased sea level and climate change pressures.

The comment follows the release of a statement from TCDC focusing on the need to manage the risk of coastal erosion on properties, a significant issue for a number of Coromandel communities.

The regional council has a solutions-focused role when it comes to addressing such problems in both the short and long terms. It researches the specific causes of erosion as part of its hazard management functions and has worked in a variety of ways to help TCDC and local communities better understand and manage the various hazards and risks. Also, as part of its regulatory role the regional council assesses the likely environmental effects of resource consent applications for “hard” structures, such as sea walls, and grants resource consent for such structures and beach replenishment where appropriate.

“With predicted sea level rise, and potential for more frequent severe weather events, under climate change, councils and communities collectively need to work together even more closely to manage the risks associated with coastal hazards,” said regional council chairperson Paula Southgate.

“The huge challenge we collectively face is balancing the protection of land and land-based assets with maintaining the natural character of beaches which are central to the attractiveness of coastal settlements – sometimes meeting both these goals can be difficult.

“The regional council recognises clearly the stress a number of Coromandel communities face due to coastal erosion and we are committed to working closely with TCDC and those communities on the best way to manage the situation, taking into account both the protection of property and the need to preserve the look and use of beaches.”

The ways in which the regional council has been helping manage erosion issues so far include:
· Advice to TCDC on “set back lines” to help avoid development in erosion-prone areas.

· $150,000 set aside for research into what can be done to manage coastal erosion in Mercury Bay in ways that won’t adversely affect beaches and still protect the land. (It’s commonly understood that coastal erosion causes are often complex and not well understood. There are examples of public money being spent on unsustainable solutions because not enough time has been taken to understand coastal processes.)

· The granting of a widespread consent to TCDC for “beach scraping” whereby sand can be moved around to help manage erosion. For example, erosion at Whangapoua during recent storms would have been more severe without works carried out after another big weather event in 2008.

· The Beachcare programme for dune restoration on the east coast which has planted and restored previously degraded dunes in many areas.

· Working closely with TCDC staff and politicians to take a strategic, long-term view of how best to manage erosion issues going forward.


“For our part, we recognize the frustration of Coromandel communities over the fact that there are no easy, comprehensive solutions to coastal erosion issues generally,” said Ms Southgate.

“Hard structures, such as sea walls, can have a role but they can also create problems by contributing to erosion elsewhere and affect the look and use of the beach. Other solutions, such as beach scraping to replenish eroded dunes, have their limitations.

“So it will be important for us all to keep working together closely to address the complexity of the issues involved in protecting our communities and the precious beaches of our region.

“During the consideration of our Long Term Plan the regional council will be looking at what further role we may play in managing coastal hazard risks in our coastal communities.”

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Parliament Today:

Werewolf: The Defence Pretence

Last year, the world began spending more money on weapons again, for the first time since 2011... New Zealand belongs to a region – Asia and Oceania – where military spending rose sharply in 2015, by 5.4 per cent. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Not Crying Foul, Argentina

So a couple of guys found to be criminally liable of environmental pollution in Argentina lodge an application with the Overseas Investment Office… in order to buy some prime New Zealand rural land. Seems that their factory back home had carelessly and/or intentionally discharged toxic waste into the Lujan river. Bummer... More>>

ALSO:

Urban & Rural: $303m To Merge And Modernise New Zealand’s Fire Services

Internal Affairs Minister Peter Dunne today announced funding of $303 million over five years to combine urban and rural fire services into one organisation from mid-2017. More>>

ALSO:

High Trust Regime: What Did The PM Tell His Lawyer About Foreign Trusts?

The Government stopped the IRD from reviewing New Zealand foreign trusts shortly after the Prime Minister’s lawyer wrote to the Revenue Minister claiming John Key had promised him the regime would not be changed. More>>

ALSO:

Road Crime: Wicked Campers Vans Classified As Objectionable

The definition of publication includes any "thing that has printed or impressed upon it, or otherwise shown upon it, 1 or more (or a combination of 1 or more) images, representations, signs, statements, or words", The Classification Office has previously classified such 'things' as billboards, t-shirts, and even a drink can. This is the first time the Classification Office has classified a vehicle. More>>

ALSO:

'When New' Repairs: Landmark EQC Settlement

The Earthquake Commission has cut a deal with 98 Canterbury homeowners that affirms the government entity's responsibility to repair earthquake-damaged property to a 'when new' state, as well as covering repairs for undamaged parts of a property and clarifying its position on cash settlement calculations. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Kiwirail’s Latest Stint In The Dogbox

The denigration of Kiwirail continues. The latest review (based on a 2014 assessment) of the options facing the company have enabled Kiwirail to be hung out to dry once again as a liability and burden on the taxpayer. More>>

ALSO:

Royal Society Report: Good Opportunities To Act Now On Climate Change

There are many actions New Zealand can and should take now to reduce the threat of climate change and transition to a low-carbon economy, a report released today by the Royal Society of New Zealand finds... More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news