Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Levin landowners get behind native fish

Levin landowners get behind native fish

Over 1,000 native plants have been planted on the Mitchell property in Levin to protect and enhance native fish habitat under the Manawatu River Leaders’ Accord.

The plants have gone in alongside streams in the Koputaroa sub-catchment, which has been identified as a regional hot-spot for native fish and a locally valued whitebait and tuna (eel) fishery.

Horizons Regional Council freshwater management officer Anna Deverall says the Mitchells are one of 12 landowners to engage with stream-side fencing and planting initiatives with help from the Leaders’ Accord and Central Government’s Fresh Start for Freshwater Clean-up Fund.

“Over 3.8km of fencing and over 3,800 native plants have gone in throughout the Koputaroa sub-catchment over the past two years. That’s fantastic news for our native fish and we’re really pleased with the uptake from landowners,” Ms Deverall says.

“Not only that, but the wider community has shown their support for the project through getting involved in the planting. Just recently members of the Horowhenua Hunting Club gave up their time to help out on the Mitchell’s property with many hands making light work of the planting.”

Planting alongside waterways provides essential shade and a food source for native fish. It can also improve the stability of stream banks and help mitigate the amount of nutrient and sediment entering a stream.

Landowner Christine Mitchell spent time completing environmental papers and working in the Freshwater Ecology Department at Massey University and says this taught her about the rapid decline in native fish populations and the need to restore their habitats.

“My husband Bruce has lived on the farm all his life and has noticed a huge reduction in fish numbers since he was a child. We had already fenced and planted wetland areas and a bush remnant or stream in partnership with Horizons, so when we heard about the financial assistance available to protect more stream habitat we jumped at the chance,” she says.

Native fish species sighted in the Koputaroa sub-catchment include banded kokopu, brown mudfish, inanga, shortfin and longfin eel and crans bully.

Ms Deverall says all of these native fish species stand to benefit from work underway.

“Due to its proximity to the coast and hills, the Koputaroa sub-catchment should have the highest level of biodiversity in the area. We’re looking forward to seeing native fish populations flourish in years to come,” she says.

Native fish habitat restoration was one of eight projects to receive funding from Central Government’s Fresh Start for Freshwater Clean-up Fund through the Manawatū River Leaders’ Accord over the past two years.

Landowners interested in undertaking stream fencing and habitat restoration are encouraged to contact Horizons’ freshwater team on toll free 0508 800 800 to discuss assistance available for this work.

More information about the Manawatū River Leaders’ Accord and its work is available online via the Manawatū River website www.manawaturiver.co.nz or Facebook page www.facebook.com/manawaturiver

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Parliament Today:

Werewolf: The Defence Pretence

Last year, the world began spending more money on weapons again, for the first time since 2011... New Zealand belongs to a region – Asia and Oceania – where military spending rose sharply in 2015, by 5.4 per cent. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Not Crying Foul, Argentina

So a couple of guys found to be criminally liable of environmental pollution in Argentina lodge an application with the Overseas Investment Office… in order to buy some prime New Zealand rural land. Seems that their factory back home had carelessly and/or intentionally discharged toxic waste into the Lujan river. Bummer... More>>

ALSO:

Urban & Rural: $303m To Merge And Modernise New Zealand’s Fire Services

Internal Affairs Minister Peter Dunne today announced funding of $303 million over five years to combine urban and rural fire services into one organisation from mid-2017. More>>

ALSO:

High Trust Regime: What Did The PM Tell His Lawyer About Foreign Trusts?

The Government stopped the IRD from reviewing New Zealand foreign trusts shortly after the Prime Minister’s lawyer wrote to the Revenue Minister claiming John Key had promised him the regime would not be changed. More>>

ALSO:

Road Crime: Wicked Campers Vans Classified As Objectionable

The definition of publication includes any "thing that has printed or impressed upon it, or otherwise shown upon it, 1 or more (or a combination of 1 or more) images, representations, signs, statements, or words", The Classification Office has previously classified such 'things' as billboards, t-shirts, and even a drink can. This is the first time the Classification Office has classified a vehicle. More>>

ALSO:

'When New' Repairs: Landmark EQC Settlement

The Earthquake Commission has cut a deal with 98 Canterbury homeowners that affirms the government entity's responsibility to repair earthquake-damaged property to a 'when new' state, as well as covering repairs for undamaged parts of a property and clarifying its position on cash settlement calculations. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Kiwirail’s Latest Stint In The Dogbox

The denigration of Kiwirail continues. The latest review (based on a 2014 assessment) of the options facing the company have enabled Kiwirail to be hung out to dry once again as a liability and burden on the taxpayer. More>>

ALSO:

Royal Society Report: Good Opportunities To Act Now On Climate Change

There are many actions New Zealand can and should take now to reduce the threat of climate change and transition to a low-carbon economy, a report released today by the Royal Society of New Zealand finds... More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news